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Sydney’s Art & Soul, a must-read for culture travellers

05 Oct 2022

With its lively arts scene and nature’s artistry on show at every turn, creative energy charges through the harbour city.

Now, as a jam-packed calendar of world-class cultural events weaves its magic throughout spring, summer and beyond, you’ll find innovation meets inspiration wherever you venture.

Here, are the must-do experiences that’ll leave you feeling energised long after the applause fades.

 

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Enjoy a refreshing new perspective

For more than 150 years the Art Gallery of New South Wales has showcased extraordinary creativity, and now its hallowed halls are set to unveil their own transformation as the Sydney Modern Project reveals a brand new building, inspiring outdoor spaces, and dynamic galleries.

Feel your mind expand as you explore the works of Adrián Villar RojasDaniel Boyd and Sol LeWitt; feast on Matt Moran’s culinary creations, and discover nature’s treasures on an Aboriginal bush tucker tour in the nearby Royal Botanic Garden.

Discover an icon’s secret stories

The Sydney Opera House is the glittering centrepiece of Australia’s arts scene, and as its pearly sails sparkle in the spring sunshine its stages feature everything from lively musicals to classic concertos.

Get swept away by powerful storytelling at Phantom of the OperaInstruments of Dance and L’Hôtel; discover the house’s rich, hidden history on a private tour, and afterwards, raise a toast as you drink in the views from the Opera BarQuay Quarter Lanes and Bennelong.

Embrace the magic where old meets new

With its futuristic cityscape perched atop historic cobbled streets, Sydney’s layers of living history set a magical scene for all manner of arts events.

At UNESCO World Heritage-Listed Cockatoo Island, the iconic architecture lends an industrial feel to contemporary events, including the upcoming season of Opera Australia’s Carmen and the Mode Festival.

The steampunk vibes continue to inspire at Carriageworks, where 1800s railway workshops host everything from the experimental art festivals to Sydney Dance Company’s New Breed – all just a stroll from South Eveleigh’s innovative eateries.

Venture east to feast your senses

With its twinkling city views, cosmopolitan villages, golden beaches and playful spirit, Sydney’s East is a cradle of creativity.

Become part of its effervescent rhythm as pop living legends Bruno MarsElton John,  Robbie Williams and Justin Bieber hit the stage; be awed and enthralled by Paddington’s eclectic galleries, and let your inspiration guide you to Bondi, where the Sculpture by the Sea exhibition showcases the world’s best creativity and landmark eateries like Sean’sIcebergs and Totti’s serve inspiration on a platter.

 

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Live in the theatrical moment

From the art deco opulence of the State Theatre to the heritage grace of the Capitol and the modern charms of the Sydney Lyric Theatre, the city’s entertainment venues are themselves inspiring works of art – and host everything from Moulin Rouge! The Musical to CinderellaThe Angels Symphony and Aussie comedy greats throughout spring and summer.

Afterwards, head to the Darling Quarter for late-night bites, before slipping between the sheets at The AidenSofitel Sydney Darling Harbour, or Crown Towers in buzzing Barangaroo.

Explore unexpected treasure troves

Wander around The Rocks and you’ll find arts, culture and entertainment as vibrant as the harbour itself.

With its thought-provoking collection of more than 4000 modern works and a rolling roster of world-class exhibitions – including the ground-breaking Do Ho Suh and Australia’s most exciting young artists – the Museum of Contemporary Art always inspires.

Nearby, look for treasures hidden in plain sight on an Aboriginal culture or architecture walking tour, before hitting refresh in YCK laneways‘ secret bars.

Revel in the buzz of diversity

Sydney’s community spirit comes to life in its lively culture. At the Casula Powerhouse Arts Centre on the banks of the Georges River you’ll find a busy spring-summer schedule of events, including the Italian Film Series, and the multimedia extravaganza, Where Shadows Meet.

Just 15 minutes drive away in Campbelltown, the offbeat Fisher’s Ghost Festival brings everyone together each November; meanwhile, in Cabramatta, the local Vietnamese community shares its delicious culinary heritage at a delectable range of eateries all year round.

Find joy in the eclectic and eccentric

With its street-art-filled lanes, breweries, and a live soundtrack featuring everything from rock to rap, the Inner West is buzzing with creativity.

Embrace its carefree spirit at the Enmore Theatre, where upcoming headliners include Eskimo Joe and Joey Bada$$.

At The Vanguard, Sonny Grin and Blondie appear between cabarets.

Out and about, you can soak up the creativity at the White Rabbit Gallery, and the Imperial and Factory Theatre, and spend a night or three basking in the inspiration at the atmospheric Old Clare Hotel.

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

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Romantic getaway: A lovers’ guide to a day in Canberra

Looking to whisk your partner away for a romantic night in Australia’s capital city, Canberra?

Whether you’re new to Canberra or just looking for something different, this guide will help you plan the perfect date.

From dinner and drinks to theatre and attractions, we’ve got you covered.

So check out our recommendations and get ready to enjoy a night you’ll never forget!

1. Watch the sunrise from a hot air balloon

Marvel at breathtaking views of the city and surrounding mountains as you watch the sunrise from a hot air balloon.

Taking off at dawn, drift gently with the wind above Canberra’s unique city design from the air with the award-winning Balloon Aloft.

Optional five-star buffet breakfast and champagne toast are available following the flight.

 

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Romantic Getaway - Hot Air Balloons

2. Tour a vineyard with stunning views

Don your walking shoes and get lost among the grapevines at Mount Majura Vineyard.

The winery, located a short drive from Canberra’s CBD, offers guided tours where you can learn about the site, and viticulture, and take in stunning views from the top of the hill.

Wander back down to the cellar door for a tasting of their award-winning Pinot Gris and other delicious varieties.

3. The perfect place for a picnic

Roll out the picnic blanket for lunch with a view on carefully cultivated lawns at the National Arboretum Canberra.

Enjoy spectacular views of the city before exploring a mosaic of living forests and gardens with more than 44,000 rare and endangered trees across the site.

4. Explore Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve

For couples who enjoy exploring, you can also head to Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve for a walk or hike.

Spot a myriad of native and endangered wildlife as you roam the forest, such as the Bush-Tailed Rock Wallaby.

5. Italian and Sons: the perfect date on romantic getaways

Cosy up for a hearty meal at one of Canberra’s award-winning restaurants, Italian and Sons.

Start off with a drink in the venue’s sleek wine bar at the back, before settling into the restaurant for a wood-fired pizza or traditional house-made pasta.

6. Nightcap lovers rejoice!

Top off the evening with a nightcap at Tipsy Bull.

The cosy, yet sophisticated establishment offers more than 300 gin varieties served deconstructed with botanicals and tonics tailored to your selection.

7. Sleep in luxury

Sleep in five-star luxury at Canberra’s award-winning Hyatt Hotel.

The popular wedding venue is oozing with heritage style and comfort with package deals available for loved-up couples and breakfast included.

Celebrate Romance in Canberra

So, if you’re looking for a romantic getaway, Canberra is the place to be.

With its stunning natural scenery and wealth of luxurious accommodation options, you’re sure to find everything you need to make your special night unforgettable.

Why not book a hot air balloon ride, visit the vineyards, enjoy a picnic, take a trek in one of the nature reserves, or explore some of the city’s best restaurants?

Whatever you choose, we guarantee that Canberra will exceed your expectations.

Book your trip today!

 

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Romantic Getaway - woman drinking wine

Romantic Getaway in Canberra.

***Content courtesy of VisitCanberra***

 

Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

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So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

A Stitch in Time: Capturing the Colours of Australia

When most people think of Australia, they imagine the bright red outback or the blue water of the Great Barrier Reef. While these holiday hotspots are popular for their vibrant colours, there are so many other hues to see in this great country.

The Colours of Australia exhibition by members of the Hervey Bay Spinners, Weavers and Fibre Artists on the Fraser Coast in Queensland brings together artworks made in response to the inspirational beauty of the Australian landscape.

Hervey Bay Regional Gallery assistant curator Llewellyn Millhouse said the works showcased the deep sense of pride and respect that these artists have for Australia’s natural environment.

“As many members of HBSWFA have experienced living and travelling all around Australia, the land and seascapes depicted in the works are exemplary of the rich diversity of our continent.

“The works feature storm clouds over a desert landscape, mossy logs in a temperate rainforest, wildflowers carpeting open plains and mangrove forests lining a tropical estuary.

“Considered together, these works reveal the natural affinity between textile and landscape, bridging the undulating contours of land and sea with the texture and form of interlocking fibres.

“From the ancient method of drop-spindle to the modern motor-driven spinning wheel, the preparation of raw fibres into workable material is key to the aesthetic process of fibre artists.”

If you’re looking to get a genuine sense of Australian culture, the Colours of Australia exhibition is a must-see.

Colours of Australia Exhibition

Colours of Australia convenor Lidia Godijn shows the major collaborative weaving project of the exhibition. PHOTOS: Jocelyn Watts

 

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Belonging: The backbone of community arts

“The art of spinning and hand-dyeing yarn was often taken for granted,” Mr Millhouse said.

“The derogatory term ‘spinster’ gives us some indications as to how this labour has been valued by the patriarchal cultures of our recent past.

“Along with other skills and productive responsibilities that are deemed ‘women’s work’, both the economic and the artistic value of fibre work has been perpetually under-appreciated.

“This dismissal of women’s labour is exacerbated by the intersection of age discrimination.

“Though the term ‘spinster’ is used less often today, the visibility, value and artistic capacity of older women continue to be undermined by our cultural institutions and in public culture more generally.

“In celebrating the work of spinning and weaving, Colours of Australia is intended as an affirmation of the vibrancy and expertise of the HBSWFA community.

“The beauty of this exhibition lies not just in each of the artworks, but also in the stories, skills and relationships that are fostered by this creative community.

“On visiting the group’s regular meetings, you cannot help but notice the joy and lightness held between its members; a sense of care, humour, connection and solidarity.

“It is these relations of reciprocity and belonging that are the backbone of community arts organisations, and which deserve further artistic recognition by contemporary art institutions.”

The nature of textiles

Textiles are often seen as a gentle art form, but there is great strength in their delicacy.

In order to create such intricate pieces, artists must have a deep understanding of both their craft and their subjects.

The fibres used each have distinct qualities that can be exploited to produce desired results.

Using colour is also integral to the success of these pieces; each hue can evoke a different emotion or feeling in the viewer.

In this Colours of Australia exhibition, the artists have expertly captured both the colours and textures of Australia’s diverse landscapes.

Colours of Australia textile exhibition

Hervey Bay spinner, weaver and fibre artist Jenny White uses a rigid heddle loom.

See Australia through the eyes of local artists

The Colours of Australia exhibition provides visitors with an opportunity to see this country through the eyes of local artists.

These artists have cleverly used textiles and landscapes to create bridges between the contours of land and sea.

As you wander through this exhibition, you’ll be able to appreciate the uniqueness of each piece while also marvelling at the overall cohesion of the show.

In addition to being visually stunning, the Colours of Australia exhibition is also deeply meaningful.

These artworks provide insight into how Australians view their natural environment.

They also reveal the importance that locals place on preserving and protecting our landscape.

This is an exhibition that will leave you feeling proud to be an Australian traveller.

The importance of art

In today’s fast-paced society, it can be easy for people to forget about the importance of slowing down in life and taking momentary pauses to enjoy what surrounds them.

Art has a way of encouraging us to do just that.

It’s a way for people to broaden their horizons and help them to understand they’re not alone in their experiences.

This Colours of Australia exhibition is a beautiful reminder of how connected we are to both our land and one another.

 

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Colours of Australia: A must-see exhibition

This exhibition is a must-see for all people travelling or living in Australia.

The extensive collection of works on display is a testament to the skill and creativity of the local artists and provides a unique insight into the Australian landscape.

If you’re looking to get a genuine sense of Australian culture, this is the perfect place to start.

Whether you’re an art lover or simply appreciate beauty, this stunning display will leave you feeling inspired.

So, make sure you add it to your itinerary when you’re next in Hervey Bay.

Contacting spinning, weaving and fibre artists

Running until 27 November 2022 at the Hervey Bay Regional Gallery, this free exhibition is open Tuesday to Friday 10am to 4pm, at weekends and on most public holidays 10am to 2pm. Check the gallery website for more details.

If you miss this exhibition or are interested in fibre or yarn crafts, you’re invited to contact the Hervey Bay Spinners, Weavers & Fibre Artists on 0457 366 738 or visit them on Facebook.

Australia is a land of many cultures and as such you’re sure to find other spinning, weaving or fibre art groups on your travels through most towns and cities.

You can also learn about spinning, weaving and fibre arts by visiting Shuttles & Needles.

 

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Colours of Australia textile exhibition

Hervey Bay textile artist Gaye Harris on a spinning wheel. Samples of her work are pictured above.

FEATURE PHOTO: Kate Campbell shows her one-of-a-kind, handcrafted scarf.

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you indulge your taste buds and curiosity while discovering the history and culture of Australia.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

Join the fun of whale watching and citizen science

Attention citizen scientists! Now’s your chance to join the fun of collecting data while out whale watching and helping researchers better understand our world.

Don’t know what citizen science is?

Citizen science is the new way for people to get involved in science and make their own contributions through observations with simple tools like cameras, notebooks or smartphones.

Oceania Project founder Dr Wally Franklin, who spoke at the University of Sunshine Coast’s Creating Waves session in Hervey Bay, has put the call out for everyone with a passion for our natural environment and whale watching to get involved.

You don’t need to have a science degree; just a passion for the natural environment and a willingness to help professional scientists with their research.

There’s nothing more satisfying than knowing that your efforts helped reveal some important information about wildlife behaviour.

Creating Waves was hosted by Fraser Coast Tourism & Events, Hervey Bay Whale Heritage Site Steering Committee and USC as part of the 2022 Hervey Bay Whale Festival.

Guests heard from those who were uniquely connected to Australia’s Humpback Whales, including the Butchulla people.

 

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Whale Watching - Humpback with baby

Humpback Whale with its baby. PHOTO: Shutterstock

Whale watching with Happy Whale

“Here in Hervey Bay, there can be up to 80,000 people a year taking digital cameras onboard whale watching tours, putting them in a prime position to help researchers study these amazing creatures,” Dr Wally said.

“There are great opportunities for citizens to become involved in the science of the whales of eastern Australia, in particular the Humpback Whale.

At Creating Waves, Dr Wally spoke about Happy Whale and its collaboration with the South Pacific Whale Research Consortium, which investigates the status of Humpback Whales.

Happy Whale is an algorithm-based photo matching platform that engages citizen scientists to help identify marine mammals by matching their photos with actual animals.

Dr Wally said the country that surrounded Hervey Bay waters where the whales came to visit every year had, for many generations, been cared for by the Butchulla people.

“The whales’ habitat is extremely fragile, so the care of the country surrounding it is critically important,” he said.

When Dr Wally and his wife Dr Trish Franklin first came to Hervey Bay over 30 years ago, research revealed Humpback Whales were using the eastern waters of Hervey Bay against K’gari (Fraser Island).

“Although there was some interesting science being done, there was insufficient data to determine who the whales were that were using Hervey Bay and why they were using the area,” Dr Wally said.

“Trish immediately saw the opportunity to address that fundamental question of who are the ones using Hervey Bay and why are they using Hervey Bay.

“To do that, she put in place a long-term study, between 1992 and 2017, based on a search technique called photo identification.

“We did 10 weeks each year out on the Bay, staying out overnight for five nights, six days every week.

“In that period, Trish observed, photographed, and recorded information on pods and individual Humpback Whales.”

Photographing flukes

“From the outset, Trish systematically photographed the underside of whale tails, the flukes,” Dr Wally said.

Whale watching - fluke

Humpback Whale fluke. PHOTO: Shutterstock

“A good example is the fluke of a whale called Nala (known locally as the pride of Hervey Bay), who we’ve been watching for over 30 years.

“She’s a regular visitor to Hervey Bay and has been bringing her calves back here almost every other year.

“Trish also realised that when you were watching a whale, what you see more often than not was the waffle side of the whale and the tail flip.

“The fluke is a fingerprint that could be used as a means of identification.

“It was possible to identify 100% of the individuals, which makes it a very useful means of studying the whales.

“The analysis of all that photography yielded a Hervey Bay Blue catalogue comprising individual whales.

“From those observations, she extracted the life histories of individual whales. She began naming the whales as an aide to memorizing them.

“How we funded the research was to invite people to pay, come and help us with the research.

“The work she did, produced one of the largest photo ID data sets in the Southern Hemisphere.

“In 2012, when she finished the work, it represented about 10% of the population, which was a very adequate sample to begin the studies.

“That data enabled Trish and me to study pod characteristics, social organisation, biology, social behaviour, abundance, population dynamics, and movements.

“So clinical verification turned out to be quite a powerful means of study.”

Female bias is unique to Hervey Bay

Dr Wally said that from all that data, Dr Trish worked out that in Hervey Bay there were three females for every male that visited the area.

“Hervey Bay is a predominantly female area from mid-July through to early November,” he said.

“The Bay is dominated by mature pregnant and lactating females who are bringing their new calves to the Bay.

“Operators of whale-watching tours say the whales absolutely love hugging the boats, which makes Hervey Bay one of the most fantastic whale-watching locations in the world.

“Overall, only a few mature males use the Bay.

“In the northern hemisphere, nobody has recorded female biases with Humpback Whales, so it’s something unique in the southern hemisphere, and very unique to Hervey Bay.”

 

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Whale Watching - Humpback Whale

Humpback Whale. PHOTO: Shutterstock

Why do Humpback Whales use Hervey Bay?

Hervey Bay is a suitable early stopover located just below the predominant whale breeding grounds of the Whitsundays Islands near Mackay and Rockhampton,” Dr Wally said.

“Humpback Whales are born in Australian waters, so they are Australian.

“They go to Antarctica for food and return every year to their home to carry out their ceremonies and sing their songs.

“Hervey Bay’s shallow protected waters against the shoreline of K’gari (Fraser Island) is one of the key things that provide avoidance for the mature females from some males that cause harassment.

“But (the males) are very organized in their harassment, but that’s another subject!

“Hervey Bay waters also provide an opportunity for physical and social development of young whales. The average stay is two weeks.”

Dorsal fins also provide identification

“Dorsal fins are as individual as flukes, although until now, all the work has been done using flukes,” Dr Wally said.

“However, in recent years, advances in the computer processing of images and the development of AI algorithm-matching techniques made it possible to consider incorporating not only flukes, but dorsal fins and lateral bodies as well.

“Such techniques are now web-based and cloud-based and provide means for scientists to match extremely large data sets.

“As Trish explored this system, she came across groups in North America that she started working with, including Happy Whale, which provides long-term secure storage of data.

“These algorithm platforms, which are open-access platforms, mean citizen science is possible on all the whale watch vessels, not only in Hervey Bay, but along the whole east coast of Australia.”

Photo ID extends Bluebell’s records by 11 years

Dr Trish developed an 11-year history between 2003 and 2011 of a whale called Bluebell that showed Bluebell’s dorsal shape and blue patterns hadn’t changed in that time.

“On 7 August 2022, Bluebell was again captured on camera,” Dr Wally said.

“The photo was loaded into Happy Whale that night and almost immediately an email came back matching Dr Trish’s pictures of Bluebell.

“So, one photograph being loaded onto Happy Whale extended the life history of that whale a further 11 years. That’s an amazing step in knowledge and understanding.

“If we have people on the whole of the east coast of Australia, including Hervey Bay, taking pictures of these whales and getting them onto that platform, we can end up with an absolutely incredible data set to work with.

“It’s a tremendous opportunity for citizen scientists.”

Baby Humpback Whale. PHOTO: Shutterstock

Be a whale-watching citizen scientist

So, if you’re looking for a fun way to help researchers learn more about whales and their habitats, while also getting some amazing whale watching in, Happy Whale is the perfect citizen science project for you.

Visit their website today to sign up and start collecting data while out whale watching!

 

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TOP 9 Hervey Bay Whale Watching Tours

  1. Whalesong Cruises
  2. Tasman Venture Whale Watching Cruise
  3. Tasman Venture – Remote Fraser Island and Whale Experience
  4. Hervey Bay Ultimate Whale Watching Cruise
  5. Freedom Whale Watch
  6. Spirit of Hervey Bay
  7. Hervey Bay Dive Centre
  8. Boat Club Adventure Cruises
  9. Blue Dolphin Marine Tours

*Source: Tripadvisor

Whale Watching - Humpback whales

Whale watching at Hervey Bay, Queensland. PHOTOS: Jocelyn Watts

 

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you tantalise your taste buds and indulge your curiosity while also discovering history and culture—all that Australia offers.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

Sneak peek at Maryborough Open Gardens

If you love gardens, then you won’t want to miss the annual Maryborough Open Gardens event, held each year in late August.

From traditional gardens to those with a more modern twist, the event is a rare opportunity for visitors to see some of the best private gardens in the city.

Hosted by the Maryborough Horticultural Society, the private gardens are open to the public for just two days every year, but there’s more to it than just seeing beautiful gardens.

Maryborough Open Gardens also raises funds through plant sales that go to local charities and encourages people of all ages (even children) to take up gardening as a hobby.

With 14 beautiful private gardens opening on 27 and 28 August 2022, it was no wonder that many visitors had trouble deciding which they liked best.

Wendy Ford from Stirling House in North Street said the fantastic response from hundreds of garden enthusiasts was wonderful to see.

“We moved into Stirling just 10 months ago and this is our first year opening to the public as part of Maryborough Open House,” she said. “It was fantastic.”

So without further ado, let’s take a look at two of the 14 gardens on show in 2022.

Whether you are a seasoned gardener or just starting out, these gardens are sure to inspire you.

 

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1. Stirling House

As I walked up the driveway toward Stirling House, Suzanne McLean’s painting at the entrance first drew my attention.

Wendy Ford’s exquisite artwork closer to the stately manor also showed Stirling House was not just a place of beauty and tranquillity, but also of storytelling.

“The painting was a gift from my neighbour, Suzanne McLean, who is a beautiful artist,” Wendy said.

“She has lived over the road for decades, raised her family there and her grandchildren, and yet had never been inside Stirling.

“We formed a lovely friendship because we both enjoy our art.

“So, I invited Suzanne over, and then when her children visited, I invited them over; and when her grandchildren visited, I invited them over.”

Wendy said the children dubbed the house ‘Rapunzel House’ because it looked like the balconies in the Rapunzel story.

“Suzanne gave me this painting as a gift, which I just still can’t believe. It’s so beautiful. She called it Wendy’s Garden. I said, ‘Let’s call it Wendy’s Garden Rapunzel House’ because that’s their history and the gift to us.”

Suzanne’s gift to her new neighbour was a wonderful way to greet the newcomers from the Brisbane suburb of Wynnum.

Just over 10 months ago, when Wendy’s husband, Bruce Ford, noticed a real estate advertisement for the sale of Stirling online, he said to her, “We should buy this place.”

“Let’s!” Wendy replied.

Five days later, they purchased it.

Previously owned by romance novelist Anne de Lisle, and before her Rod Grieves, the house dates back over 140 years.

The stunning home features some American Gothic styling combined with the look of a Queenslander.

“Anne had the house set up beautifully, but since then we’ve made a lot of changes to the gardens. Wendy is the gardener. I’m the labourer,” Bruce laughed.

History and nature thrive in revamped gardens.

Goldfish love to swim around in the large 3-tiered fountain, where they can explore all their favourite nooks and crannies. The original smaller fountain is also home to many of them as well.

Restored garden seats provide a place for peaceful resting.

The hedges have been replanted, and arbours remain with two Petrea Volubilis and other plants like Yellow Bells, Jasmine and Climbing Roses.

The garden is a colourful oasis with new plantings including Summer Sense, Murraya, Gardenias, Rhoeo, Bromeliads, Magnolias, Rosemary, Lavender, Grevilleas, Lilies, Blue Eyes, and annuals.

“A mango tree was dying, so it’s now with the local wood turners’ group where members are turning it into bowls and other beautifully turned pieces,” Bruce said.

Maryborough Open Gardens - Stirling House

Maryborough Open Gardens - Stirling House

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2. 296 Lennox Street

It was easy to see why the garden at 296 Lennox Street is one of Maryborough’s finest. The lush greenery and beautiful flowers were what first caught my eye.

A leisurely walk through the beautiful and diverse gardens took me on a journey of discovery, with intriguing plants like azaleas, citrus trees, and potted flowers.

At each turn, there was another world full of fauna and flora that offered their own gifts for visitors keen to explore the natural space.

As well as the mature trees, palms and explosion of colour one might expect to see in a traditional garden, there were also rarer plants such as Phoenix palms surrounded by agapanthus, hoya plants, and Indian rope plants growing under the shade of the historic Queenslander home.

The southwest side of the house was home to a giant mango tree that was originally planted to shade the house from the western sun. The tree also provided ample shade and shelter for a rock garden and shade-loving plants beneath.

Beside the mango tree was a large deciduous Persimmon Tree, and a Coral Tree coming from India and Western China that was just getting its little flowers on the top.

Along the side fence, a stunning Fraser Island Creeper (Tecomanthe hillii), was just coming into bloom, a rare thing at this time of year.

The house itself is relatively unique because it straddles two blocks of land. Built in the middle of the double block, it dates back to about 1905.

There aren’t many houses built on two blocks of land in Maryborough.

Maryborough Open Gardens - 296 Lennox Street

Maryborough Open Gardens - 296 Lennox Street

PHOTOS: Jocelyn Watts

So, if you’re a fan of gardens, or just want to see some beautiful ones, mark your calendars for next year and head over to the Maryborough Open Gardens website to find out which gardens will be opening.

 

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you indulge your taste buds and curiosity while discovering the history and culture of Australia.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

9 reasons to visit Jumpers and Jazz in July

Looking for a fun-filled winter getaway in Queensland? Head to the Queensland city of Warwick for Jumpers and Jazz in July.

The 10-day festival celebrates winter with all the exuberant colours of nature and delicious flavours of local foods.

Warwick’s streets come alive with fantastic tree sculptures, yarn bombing exhibitions and a huge car display; there’s a church tower covered by knitwear as well.

And to top it off­­—you get jazz music performed by some amazing musicians who’ve come from near or far just for this occasion too.

Jumpers and Jazz in July began in 2004 when the Warwick Art Gallery wrapped trees in textile art to brighten up the cold winter streets.

The exhibition has since grown into a much-anticipated community event, with locals competing to create the most impressive and creative designs.

Whether you’re into jazz music or just want to take in the festive atmosphere, there’s something for everyone.

For the latest information on festival dates, visit Jumpers and Jazz in July.

 

trees wrapped in knitted art works

Warwick Art Gallery wraps trees in textile art to brighten up the cold winter streets for Jumpers and Jazz in July. Photo: Warwick Art Gallery

 

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1.     Technicolour dreamland made of yarns

If you’ve ever been to Jumpers and Jazz in July, you’ll know that the streets of Warwick are transformed into a technicolour dreamland for the duration of the festival.

That’s all thanks to the Yarntopians yarnbombing team of crafters who combine their skills to produce stunning art installations that attract thousands of festival visitors each year.

Their large-scale installations take months to complete and can involve up to 100 contributors.

Knitters and crocheters send them pieces from all over Australia, and their smaller local team gets together regularly to assemble and install everything.

A chief organiser of one festival project in 2022 was my late mother-in-law, Georgie Watts, a long-time parishioner at St Mark’s Anglican Church. Georgie was heavily involved in St Mark’s display of knitted and crocheted flowers that adorned the historic church’s tower throughout the 2022 festival. Sadly, Georgie didn’t to see the colourful flowers draped over the church tower. She passed away a month before the event.

St Mark's Anglican Church

St Mark’s Anglican Church, Warwick, Queensland.

2.     Art at St Mark’s Anglican Church

St Mark’s Anglican Church is a beautiful heritage-listed church in the heart of Warwick and hosts the annual Art@StMark’s display and sale of high-quality artworks during Jumpers and Jazz in July.

During the 10-day festival, visitors can view and buy art and crafts, and get a bite to eat at their Art Café in the church hall on Grafton Street.

There’s also a Meet the Artists and Official Opening event. For details visit www.warwickanglican.org.au or phone Sharon 0428 614 708.

To book, email artatstmarksno2@gmail.com

 PHOTO GALLERY

3.     Tree Jumper Exhibition

Jumpers and Jazz in July is a great time to check out the Tree Jumper exhibition in Warwick. Up and down the footpath, you’ll find trees wrapped in charming textile artwork.

These yarn-bombed masterpieces are a visual treat for all ages, and they’ll be on display 24 hours a day throughout the festival.

Jumpers and Jazz in July is all about creativity and community participation in the arts, and every year the events and activities continue to grow.

So be sure to check out the program for each day of the winter festival.

 

4.     Grand Automobile Display

If you love cars and music, then you’ll love Jumpers and Jazz in July. This annual winter festival takes place in the charming town of Warwick, Queensland.

The main street of the CBD is closed to traffic, so visitors can admire a static display of veteran, vintage and classic vehicles.

There’s also a selection of classic motorcycles on display, building on Warwick’s growing reputation as the Horsepower Capital of Australia!

During the festival, you can enjoy live jazz performances in various venues around town.

Or if you prefer, you can simply take a leisurely stroll and soak up the atmosphere.

And don’t forget to keep an eye out for the trees dressed in woolly jumpers—it’s all part of the fun!

 

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5.     Celebration of local flavours

Jumpers and Jazz in July is a great opportunity to check out some of the best food and drinks Warwick has to offer.

Stroll & Swing on Palmerin features the Celebration of Local Flavours—an opportunity for the region’s primary producers and boutique or cottage industry vendors to showcase their direct-market goods.

Visitors can enjoy a firsthand experience of local produce at the alfresco dining spaces on the street.

Jumpers and Jazz is a great opportunity to support local businesses. Make sure you don’t miss out!

6.     Women in Motorsport Track Day Invitation

The Warwick District Sporting Car Club is inviting everyone to spend a day at the Morgan Park Raceway for the Women in Motorsport Track Day.

Anyone interested in getting into motorsports can experience the thrill of motorsport and see how it all works.

The club will provide instructions on general maintenance and give you the opportunity to drive your own day-drive car or be a passenger with an experienced driver in a race car.

This is a great opportunity to jumpstart your interest in car racing and build your confidence in-car operations and functions.

For more details or to register your interest, contact the club secretary at secretary@wdscc.com.au.

7.     Markets

Jumpers and Jazz in July has a range of markets where you can find unique, handmade products to help you get into the spirit of the event.

Artisans from all over come to sell their wares and you’re sure to find something that catches your eye.

Whether you’re looking for a new jumper to keep you warm during the cooler nights of the festival or a piece of art to take home with you, head on down and support local artists while getting into the festival spirit.

  • RETRO ROCKING AT THE GALLERY is a small boutique market coordinated by Warwick Art Gallery. Featuring excellent artisans who present amazing bespoke wares of flair and colour, you’ll be able to find some great gifts for friends and family, or maybe even something special for yourself.
  • SHOWCASING OUR ATELIERS
    If you’re ever feeling creative, or need some inspiration, head to Showcasing our Ateliers. You can meet the artisans and immerse yourself in workshops and demonstrations. It’s a great way to get inspired, and maybe even learn a new skill.
  • SUITCASE RUMMAGE MARKET
    Looking for something a little different at Jumpers and Jazz in July? Check out the Suitcase Rummage Market. This unique market features many pre-loved and vintage items, from clothes and jewellery to books and records. And because they sell all of the goods out of suitcases, you never know what you might find. So head on down and rummage through some bargains.
  • WARWICK POTTERS CRAFT MARKET
    Jumpers and Jazz in July culminates in a large craft market on Palmerin Street, with over 200 stalls selling handmade arts and crafts, food and drink. There is also plenty of entertainment on offer, with live music and a wine bar.

8. St Mary’s Community Contemplative Tree

St Mary’s Catholic Church is a beautiful and unique church located at 163 Palmerin Street, Warwick.

The church was built in 1926 and the museum (1865) is also a must-see.

During Jumpers and Jazz in July, people are invited to participate in the Community Contemplative Tree, while enjoying the vista of yarn-bombed palm trees and church pillars.

Hand-knitted and crochet scarves and beanies can be taken home.

The event is also a great opportunity to learn about the history of the church and the Warwick community.

There are also tours of the church and museum available.

St Mary’s Parish is an involved community of the Warwick township and the historical and architectural value are enormous.

The church and museum are a must-see for anyone visiting Warwick.

9. Warwick Art Gallery Exhibitions

The Warwick Art Gallery is a great place to check out some amazing art.

In 2022, the Paper Quilt project is the culmination of their general call out for works on paper that respond to the word “abundance”. It’s on display in the Orange Wall Gallery.

Another exhibition is the Australia Wide 8 Art Quilt Exhibition. This is the latest biennial travelling exhibition in the Australia Wide series, organized by Ozquilt Network Inc.

The exhibition showcases the work of Ozquilt Network members in Australia and overseas. It demonstrates the variety of the ‘stitched and layered textile’.

 

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Want more festival information?

There’s so much more happening than my overview here, so be sure to visit the official website (link below) for this year’s dates, the full program and a list of entertainers.

https://www.jumpersandjazz.com.au/

Where is Warwick?

Warwick is a town in southeast Queensland, Australia, located 130 kilometres southwest of Brisbane, and 83.5 km south of Toowoomba.

With a population of 15,380 (as of June 2018), Warwick is the administrative centre of the Southern Downs Region local government area.

The surrounding Darling Downs has fostered a strong agricultural industry for which Warwick, together with the larger city of Toowoomba, serves as convenient service centres.

Warwick is accessible via the Warwick train station on the Warwick line or by car from any number of Warwick’s multiple exits off the Warrego Highway.

Once in Warwick, visitors can explore a variety of historical landmarks such as:

For those looking for a more modern activity, there are also a number of shopping and dining options available in the Warwick CBD.

Whatever your interests, Warwick has something to offer everyone.


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So, what are you waiting for?

Mark the date in your calendar and get ready for a great time in Warwick.

And, when you’re admiring one of the festival’s many intricate designs, remember—it’s all made of yarn by contributors from throughout Australia.

Jumpers and Jazz in July - musicians

Jazz musicians in concert. Photo: Commons.Wikimedia

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***

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Journey to Queensland’s lost world of dinosaurs

In Part Two of our series on dinosaurs, Peter Woodland takes you through Charleville and Barcaldine before heading deeper into Queensland where you can find more prehistoric reptile fossils near Winton. Keep reading!

Where to from Lightning Ridge? North! We’re heading to Winton, but there are a few interesting stops on the way.

I’d head north from Lightning Ridge through Hebel, Dirranbandi and Ballon on the A2 highway.

The most direct and shortest route to Longreach and Winton is the A2 and it will take you through historic Barcaldine, home of the 1893 Shearers Strike and the birth of the Australian Labor Party.

However, let’s not rush. Just north of Boatman, I’d take a left turn to Charleville.

 

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Get up close and personal with the cosmos and bilbies

Trail of dinosaurs - the Bilby experience

Bilby. Photo: Creative Commons

I’d do that because there are a couple of attractions in Charleville that I think are worth a look and we’re not in a hurry, are we?

Charlieville boasts the Cosmos Centre. It is an open-air astronomical observatory that is a treat for young and old.

We nomads know the night sky is an unfathomable wonder, way out there, but the Cosmos Centre will take you even closer.

There are other observatories around Australia, but I don’t know of one with as consistently clear skies as Charleville.

The next morning, you can visit the Charleville Bilby Experience at the local railway station.

These little critters are adorable and surprisingly little known.

If, however, Australia is serious about guarding and preserving this wide brown land we are fortunate to be custodians of, we could start with the bilby.

Clear your mind of the Easter Bunny; take the legend of the Easter Bilby home to your families and grandchildren.

Destined for dinosaurs

Dinosaurs - australovenitor

Australovenitor at the Australian Age of Dinosaurs. Photo: Creative Commons

Heading north again, we return to the A2 and will eventually arrive in Barcaldine.

It’s only a short trip to Longreach and, then, Winton.

There are attractions in both of these centres worth dallying for, but we’re interested in dinosaurs and they are tantalisingly close.


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Stay at the home of Waltzing Matilda

In Winton, apart from the tourist parks, there are several hotels and motels from which to choose. Of note is the historic North Gregory Hotel.

Banjo Patterson wrote Waltzing Matilda while staying nearby at Dagworth Station and it is reliably reported that it was first recited at the North Gregory on April 6, 1895.

On the subject, the Waltzing Matilda Centre, in Winton’s main street, is a trove of detail about the era and the human faces behind this quintessential Australian piece.

Trail of dinosaurs - hotel in Winton

North Gregory Hotel. Photo: Creative Commons

 

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See world-class dinosaur attractions

Now as to the Dinosaurs, I hear you ask.

The area around Winton was, again, on the edge of that erstwhile sea, mentioned previously, during the early to mid-Cretaceous, 145mya to 110mya.

It abounds in dinosaurs and other prehistoric reptile fossils.

The district boasts the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History and Lark Quarry.

These attractions are spectacular, world-class facilities and both are an easy drive from the centre of Winton.

Dinosaurs - two models

Dinosaurs at the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History near Winton. Photo: Jocelyn Watts

Dinosaurs - Lark Quarry

Lark Quarry, Winton. Photo: Jocelyn Watts

WINTON PHOTO GALLERY

 

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Explore further afield

If you wish to venture further afield while based in Winton, new discoveries and a comprehensive display of some of the denizens of the Eromanga Sea can be found in Boulia.

Alternatively, head to Eromanga and the Eromanga Natural History Museum to meet Cooper, the largest dinosaur found in Australia to date.

 

***

Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you tantalise your taste buds and indulge your curiosity while also discovering history and culture—all that Australia offers.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

Explore dinosaur trails less travelled

Have you ever wanted to take a journey in the footsteps of giants? One that is less travelled by man, and full of prehistoric wonder!

Well, now’s your chance because Australia’s dinosaur trails have opened up in this amazing world.

But if you’re already a dedicated traveller, there may be none of the well-known trails left in your repertoire.

So why not invent one of your own? May I suggest a slightly different trail?

If you’re a grey nomad or any other southern self-contained gadabout and you’re heading north to sunny Queensland, start your trail at Lightning Ridge in far northern NSW.

If you’re already in North Queensland, simply start at the other end.

 

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Start at Lightning Ridge

Dinosaur Trails - Cretaceous Australia.

Cretaceous Australia. Photo: Creative Commons

Lightning Ridge is the source of some of Australia’s most spectacular dinosaur fossils; spectacular because they are opalised.

The district is a productive sight for Australian opals and that can add another dimension to your visit.

Most dinosaur discoveries at Lightning Ridge are from the Early to Mid Cretaceous periods, between 145mya and 110mya.

At this time central Australia was covered by a vast, relatively shallow, inland sea. Lightning Ridge would have been on the south-eastern shore of this sea.

These opal fields are the source of several important dinosaur fossil finds. Most recently, the small ornithopod dinosaur, Weewarrasaurus pobeni, was announced in 2019.

This dinosaur was small, approximately dog-sized and likely travelled in family groups or herds for protection. We know it from two fragments of a jawbone and some teeth.

Dinosaur fossils found in an opal mine

Prior to that, fossils of what appears to be a herd of larger ornithopod dinosaurs were found deep underground in an opal mine.

This dinosaur, Fostoria dhimbangunmal, is related to the well-known Muttaburrasaurus from North-western Queensland.

Over 60 bones have been discovered for this species representing four individuals.

The species name is a local Aboriginal word meaning ‘sheepyard’ from the locality where the fossils were found.

Numerous other fragments and bones of extinct dinosaurs remain to be identified in the district. Perhaps the most tantalising of these is ‘Lightning Claw’.

This dinosaur is known from very little evidence and none sufficient to flesh it out or officially give it a name.

It is assumed to be a large theropod, a Megaraptor, perhaps the largest of a type of dinosaur rarely found in the Australian fossil record.

Lightning claw

Lightning Claw. Photo: Creative Commons

Things to see and do at Lightning Ridge

Lightning Ridge has several caravan parks. Check out the fossicking heaps at the Tourist Information Centre.

The John Murray Gallery is a must, and a good meal can be had at the Lightning Ridge Bowls Club.

In particular, I’d recommend Piccolo Italian Restaurant. The food is superb but whatever you do, don’t ask for connolis.

This is a proud Roman restaurant and they don’t do that sort of Sicilian fare, as I discovered when I asked. They were polite but very definite.

Try the Car Door Tours; an economical, quaint way to see the sights.

When you get to Lightning Ridge, ask about the new Australian Opal Centre.

This is a proposed, state-of-the-art museum to be built into the earth at Lightning Ridge. Construction is due to start in 2022.

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Lightning Ridge - Car Door Tours

The Car Door Tours at Lighting Ridge are a must-see attraction. Photo: Jocelyn Watts

Lightning Ridge - John Murray Gallery Mural

John Murray Gallery mural at Lightning Ridge. Photo: Jocelyn Watts

Explore Australia’s lesser-known dinosaur trails

So you’re looking for a destination that’s off the beaten path, why not explore some of Australia’s lesser-known dinosaur trails?

These areas are home to prehistoric creatures that once roamed the earth, and offer an unforgettable experience for travellers of all ages.

Lightning Ridge

Sunset at Lightning Ridge with a labyrinth. Photo: Shutterstock

 

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PART TWO: DINOSAURS IN QLD

 

***

Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you tantalise your taste buds and indulge your curiosity while also discovering history and culture—all that Australia offers.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

The story behind Maryborough’s coat of arms

Did you know that Maryborough, Queensland, has its own coat of arms? If you’re visiting the Heritage City, you can see its coat of arms on a wall facing the Town Hall Green. Titled ‘The Crest’, it is one of 40+ murals that make up the Maryborough Mural Trail. To learn more about this piece of local history, read on! Our contributor, Peter Woodland, shares some insights into the fascinating world of heraldry.

The surprising number of Australian cities with coats of arms

According to the Heraldry of the World wiki 108 Australian cities have coats of arms.

There are, in fact, at least 394 Australian cities with a population of more than 10,000 people and there are another 88 towns with a population of more than 5000.

Perhaps, in your travels, keep your eye out for municipal coats of arms. It could be just one more enjoyable pastime, as you while away the kilometres.

 

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Who can have a coat of arms?

In Australia, anyone can adopt a coat of arms of their own design. However, there are some limitations to that process.

The said coat of arms is not theirs exclusively. It can be used and copied by anyone unless some copyright applies.

If the coat of arms they adopt is the same as one borne by an armiger whose coat of arms was granted by the College of Arms in London or by some other official body in other parts of the world, then its use is illegal.

It may come as a surprise to many that family coats of arms are very rare in the British domain.

Just because your name is Fortesque-Smythe, for example, it does not follow that you can use the coat of arms of someone else called Fortesque-Smythe.

You have to be able to trace a direct line through the eldest child, usually male, in each generation, back to the original “owner” of the arms.

In the British world, arms are granted to an individual, an enterprise or an institution, not to families.

That is just one of many “rules’ one has to get used to in the world of heraldry.

What is heraldry?

Heraldry began as the use of a distinctive shield or, perhaps, coat to identify a combatant on a battlefield.

They were simple and brightly or unusually coloured so that your side knew who you were.

The best coats of arms to this day follow that custom of simplicity.

Perhaps the aspect of heraldry most difficult to understand is the blazon.

This is words written in a particular style to describe the coat of arms.

It includes old and foreign words and follows an order of precedent.

This is one such blazon:

Quarterly, 1 and 4 Gules three Pallets Argent and 2 and 3 Azure, three Bars wavy Argent a Cross embattled counter embattled throughout Or and overall a Maltese Cross Azure

That is the blazon for the shield from the coat of arms of the City of Maryborough, in Queensland, Australia. It means:

A shield divided into quarters. The first and fourth quarters are red and silver (white) alternating vertical stripes. The second and third quarters are blue and silver (white) alternating horizontal wavy stripes. The quarters are divided by a gold cross that is embattled. That is, its edges are “jagged” as in the top of a traditional castle wall. Over the top of all this is a blue Maltese cross.

This is Maryborough’s coat of arms:

Coat of Arms - Maryborough, Qld

 

As you can see there are several other elements to Maryborough’s coat of arms. These elements are part of the original grant.

Some of them such as the two supporters on either side and the “ground” or compartment, they are standing on are rare in an individual’s coats of arms. They have to be granted by the sovereign.

Another element is a helmet and there are rules about what sort of helmet individuals can use. On the other hand, it does not have to be a medieval “knights” helmet. It could be a miner’s hard-hat, for instance, if appropriate.

Above the helmet is a torse or twisted piece of cloth or some other cloth buffer. On the torse sits the crest.

I bet you wondered when I was going to use that word because many of us talk about the crest as being the whole thing.

The crest can be almost anything, if appropriate and is often used as a badge by the armiger (owner of the arms).

It might serve as a monogram on clothing, a signet ring, a logo on personal stationery or anything you desire.

In the case of Maryborough, it is the schooner “Blue Jacket”, at sea, on a circle of spiky (embattled) gold circles, with two sticks of sugar cane.

Lastly, there is the motto, beneath the shield. The motto can say almost anything and can be in any language, Klingon, if you wish.

Mottos can be tricky though because it is supposedly a statement of deeply held views and character.

Don’t give yourself a motto about bravery, if, in reality, you ascribe to the view that “He who runs away lives to fight another day.”

Maryborough’s motto is Latin and it means: Faith, Strength and Courage

 

 

Maryborough received a badge when these arms were granted and this is it:

coat of arms - maryborough badge

The badge repeats the colours and symbols of the arms.

Granted?

Granted, I hear you ask. Yes, granted!

In Australia “official” coats of arms are granted by a British College of Arms.

The gentlemen responsible for the design and grant of the arms to Maryborough were:

Sir Alexander Colin Cole, Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order, upon whom has been conferred the Territorial Decoration, Garter Principal King of Arms, Sir Anthony Richard Wagner, Knight Commander of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath, Knight Commander of the Royal Victorian Order, Clarenceux King of Arms and John Philip Brooke Brooke-Little, Esquire, Commander of the Royal Victorian Order, Norroy and Ulster, King of Arms.

Make your own coat of arms

Municipal coats of arms can be fun to look for, and they can also be a great way to learn more about the places you visit.

If you’re feeling creative, there’s no reason why you can’t come up with your own arms for yourself or your town or city.

Just make sure you follow all the “rules”. After all, you wouldn’t want to get in trouble with the arms authorities!

 

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***

Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you tantalise your taste buds and indulge your curiosity while also discovering history and culture—all that Australia offers.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

Croquet clubs make for great travel destinations

Have you ever played croquet? No?! Well, it’s definitely time to add it to your bucket list!

While visiting the Queensland city of Bundaberg, members of the Bundaberg Croquet Club introduced me to the classic game and I have to say, it was a lot of fun.

The club members were friendly and happy to show me (pictured right below) basic moves of the game that date back hundreds of years.

Bundaberg Croquet Club president Jennifer Lee said not only was croquet a lot of fun, but it was also the perfect addition to any holiday, whether in Bundaberg or anywhere else.

“Whether playing on your own or with friends, croquet is a great way to enjoy leisurely days outdoors,” Jennifer said.

“It’s a fun and challenging game that can be enjoyed by people of all ages.”

Newbies, including (right) Peter Woodland and Jocelyn Watts, try out the traditional game of croquet.

 

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A brief history of Croquet

Croquet has been around for centuries, having become popular in Europe in the 1800s.

Its roots can be found in Ireland. The name “crookey” comes from crook + oy ( hooked stick).

A Dutch folktale mentions how players would use an indoor clay court with football-sized wooden balls and one metal ring to play Beugelen or Maillette–two different games that emerged in Europe as well.

Introduced to England by John Jaques, the game of croquet became an instant hit with middle-class attendees at The Great Exhibition of 1851.

Croquet played an important role in the lives of Victorian aristocracy, with many wealthy individuals building courts within their expansive estates.

Over time, different variations of the game developed for different audiences.

For example, there are now games specifically designed for children and seniors.

Today, the game remains a popular game enjoyed by all ages, and it is still associated with elegance and refinement.

The Bundaberg Croquet Club at 29 Quay Street, Bundaberg West, is as busy today as it was when founded in 1900.

croquet - postcard scene

A card depicting a game of croquet on the beach, by Lucien Tanquerey, 1910-1919, Wikimedia Commons.

How to play

Croquet is typically played on a lawn or other open space, and involves hitting balls with mallets through hoops.

The game is relatively easy to learn, but it takes practice to master.

The basic rules are as follows:

  • Each player starts with two balls, and the first player to get both balls through all the hoops wins the game.
  • There are many different ways to score points, and players can also knock other players’ balls out of bounds.

Court etiquette

Croquet is an engaging sport that requires skill, strategy, and tact.

Whether you’re an experienced player or a newcomer just learning the rules, it is important to be mindful of the proper etiquette when playing a game.

Some basic tips for maintaining good etiquette on the court include following the correct order of shots, staying alert during your opponent’s turns, and knowing how to give and receive compliments.

With these simple guidelines in mind, you can ensure that every game is enjoyable, both for yourself and everyone else on the court.

The benefits of playing croquet

Croquet is a recreational activity that offers a wealth of benefits.

First, the game requires players to exercise both their bodies and their minds.

Whether you are playing singles or doubles, Croquet requires you to balance, coordinate your movement, and think strategically in order to succeed.

No matter your age, skill level or fitness level, you can enjoy the sport at your own pace while exercising your body.

Additionally, Croquet is a sociable activity that encourages good sportsmanship and interaction between players.

How to get involved

If you’re looking to get started with this exciting game, there are several ways to get involved.

One option is to find a club in your area and sign up for lessons or training sessions.

Another way to learn about the game is by watching instructional videos online.

You could also use resources like books, magazines, and other Croquet-related materials to gain a deeper understanding of the game.

Pack a Croquet set for your next trip

When planning your next trip, consider packing a Croquet set along with your other supplies.

Croquet is a great game to play while travelling throughout Australia.

It’s a great way to meet new people and can be easily set up and played in a variety of locations, wherever there is open space in parks or open areas.

To set up the game, simply place the hoops in a square formation, with each hoop placed about seven yards apart.

The first player then hits the ball through all the hoops, in order, before returning to the start point and hitting the ball through the hoops again.

You can find croquet sets at Amazon Australia or most local sports stores, so it is easy to get started.

Just be sure to wear sunscreen and stay hydrated on those hot days.

croquet - modern equipment

Modern croquet equipment. Photo by Winnywinn, 2008, Wikimedia Commons.

 

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Visit Bundaberg Croquet Club

And, if you’re passing through Bundaberg, be sure to visit the Bundaberg Croquet Club and meet the friendly members who are keen to introduce new people to the game.

Visitors can play a casual game for just $10.

President Jennifer Lee said local members were always happy to help beginners, so you’ll be up and playing in no time.

There is also a clubhouse, which makes for a perfect place to relax after playing. It’s also available to hire for events.

Croquet is also the perfect way to enjoy the Australian sunshine and take in the beautiful scenery near the Bundaberg Croquet Club, right next to the picturesque Burnett River.

Who knows, you might just get hooked on this historic game and make some wonderful new friends.

To find out more about the club visit https://www.croquetqld.org/clubs/wide-bay-burnett/bundaberg-croquet-club, phone (07) 4152 8472, or email bundaberg@croquetqld.org

croquet - card depicting children

A card depicting children playing Croquet. Photographer unknown. Source: University of British Columbia Library. Wikimedia Commons.


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