Art & Design

Stefano Guseli chats about his art and exhibitions

Hervey Bay artist Stefano Guseli has a lot to say about art. In this interview, he chats with Jocelyn Magazine about his unique approach to art-making, the role of intuition in his work, and how he strives for creative spontaneity in his pieces. If you’re curious about what drives an experimental artist like Stefano, and where you can see his next exhibitions, be sure to check out this interview!

‘Art is a mirror for the viewer, not a soapbox for the artist’

“Once you have sent a thought, it will not return. Once captured, it will not be let go of. The moment of realisation, the moment of transference, is a shared moment—something to treasure, not to disdain.”

This idea about the transference of thoughts is the basis of Stefano Guseli’s rationale for his art exhibitions in Maryborough, Queensland, later this year and in 2023.

“Perhaps letting go is the most vital part of the puzzle,” the Hervey Bay High School design teacher said.

“Once a ball is thrown, the pitcher has no control over the reaction. It is suspended in mid-air, defying gravity, hurtling, diving, and closing the gap between the two,” he said.

“If it is caught, the moment is not over, but it has just begun.

“Elation or loss may result. Can the pitcher take back the throw? Can the hands of time be wound back? Which is more reasonable? To pitch again or to take back the impossible?”

Stefano uses the metaphor of a ball game to explain how he sees the relationship between his artwork and its viewers.

“I know a lot of artists work to express themselves, but I prefer to make art for the viewer to be immersed in it and to interpret it their way.

“I feel the art I make is more of a mirror for the viewer rather than a mirror for me, so I shy away from interpreting individual artworks for the viewer.

“Basically, I can write anything I want on the plaque next to it in a gallery, but it is the viewer who I want to interpret my work.”

Stefano’s art

While French artists Henri Matisse and Marcel Duchamp, and the Spanish painter Pablo Picasso have influenced Stefano’s method, what he paints comes from 20th-century art history and contemporary movements.

From Bendigo, Victoria, Stefano studied art and design at La Trobe and Griffith universities.

He moved to Queensland about 14 years ago to marry his wife, Kim Guseli; they now live in Hervey Bay with their two loveable Dachshunds Lucia and Dexter.

Stefano has his own backyard “man cave” where his thoughts and ideas come to life as visual art.

“I like to observe the way art has developed over the past 100 years, particularly with the visual experience and installations. They are two very different things.”

“With installations, I’m getting more heavily into the style of the Dadadists, an art group from the First World War. For example, I’ve got a few found objects, such as an old television set, that I’ve incorporated into my artwork.

“But I don’t reconstitute found objects to make them look like something visual for example spoons welded together to look like an animal.

“I class myself as an ‘experimental artist’ because I really don’t know where I’m going with it. All I know is I’m going somewhere with it!”

While most human figures in Stefano’s painting come from his imagination, some are based on real people.

“The ones based on real people are abstracted, so I don’t reveal who they are. It’s more about abstracting the narrative.”

Stefano Guseli - artist and painting

Hervey Bay Artist Stefano Guseli at work in his backyard “man cave”.

Preferred mediums

Stefano’s preferred art medium is acrylic because it dries more quickly and he can work faster, but he also loves oils.

“I love the richer, more vibrant textural qualities of oils, but it has drawbacks.

“One of my oils was so thick it took two months to dry!

“I submitted it to a competition, but the judge disqualified it; not because it was wet, but because it was still too soft in spots.”

Stefano mixes his own colours but sometimes they come straight out of the tubes.

“My artworks are usually pretty bright! I find bright colours, not diluted with black, grey and white, can be very positive.”

Experimental art

As an experimental artist, Stefano looks at the visual aesthetic, the installation, and the conceptual sides of art, pushing those elements together, apart, or moving them around, which is unusual.

“A lot of early experimental artists ended up spearheading methods for future ideas in the arts,” he said.

“If I got onto the bandwagon of a painting to a certain theme, I could see a trajectory in a direction where I could attract a certain type of clientele or a certain type of viewer and I’d keep making that sort of art.

“Some masters did that. They made the artwork that people liked, and that was in demand, so they were cutting edge in the eyes of many collectors.

“Experimental art is not theme-based repetition, at least it should not be in my view.”

Stefano said he also has a passion for book illustrations, which he has done several times in recent years.

“Illustrating is a finished product I can give to the client,” he said.

“It’s a reciprocal arrangement too, making the author happy, the publisher happy, the reader happy, and me happy!”

Competitions

Stefano has only recently begun entering art competitions, so it’s a case of “watch this space”.

“I’m hoping to submit to the Archibald competition,” he said.

“Many of the artists who are successful are known in the painting community, but being an experimental artist it’s not my niche,” he said.

“So, we’ll see how I go over the next few years.

“You do your best work, submit it, see how the judges go with it and then see how the public goes with it.

“Entering competitions is often just an exercise in seeing what reaction you get from viewers and what comments they make.

“That’s really why I’m entering.”

Why create art?

“The choice to create art is about being true to the viewer by making it as an artistic mirror which reflects their interpretation,” Stefano said.

“Why am I making this piece? Am I making it because I do really want to, or am I solely interested in profit?

“Some of the most successful artists, mainly American and British artists, who sell their work for millions of dollars have been accused of being peddlers, but I don’t think they are.

“I think they’re just extremely successful financially.  Money should not be the primary purpose in art making.

“Any artists, even very poor artists, can make art and sell works for money.

“The point is art should be a connection. If money comes in small or large amounts, that is not the primary purpose.”

Where you can see Stefano’s art

If you’re interested in seeing Stefano’s latest work, he has two exhibitions in the pipeline.

The first will be at the Maryborough Art Society Gallery in Kent Street from December 2022 to January 2023, and the second, at the same gallery, in August 2023.

So, mark your calendars if you want to see some amazing pieces by one of Fraser Coast’s most talented artists.

In the meantime, check out some of Stefano’s pieces on his website at https://www.stefanoguseli.net/

Stefano Guseli - artist and painting

Stefano Guseli, Hervey Bay Artist.

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Rotary Peace Pole: A reminder to strive for world peace

Have you seen the new Rotary Peace Pole outside the Brolga Theatre in the Queensland city of Maryborough yet? It’s a beautiful sight.

The pole, consisting of three elements, is a hand-crafted monument that displays the message “May Peace Prevail on Earth” on each of its sides in different languages.

There are tens of thousands of Peace Poles in 180 countries across the world, dedicated as monuments to peace. They serve as a constant visual reminder to strive for world peace.

The project was unveiled recently in a dedication ceremony where it’s installed beside the pathway leading to the Brolga Theatre from Lennox Street.

 

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Peace Pole designed by local artists; supported by Council

The Maryborough Peace Pole, a project of the Rotary Club of Maryborough Sunrise, was designed by local artist and Rotarian Willy Paes (pictured with his wife Di) with assistance from Fraser Coast Regional Council senior arts development co-ordinator Trevor Spohr.

The project was supported by many local businesses, other Rotary Clubs through a Rotary Grant, and the Fraser Coast Regional Council through a grant from the discretionary fund of Councillor Daniel Sanderson.

The work consists of three distinct pieces, which unite as one to symbolise our need to move forward together.

The pieces range in height up to five metres high and have been placed in a stepped design to mirror the roofline of the Brolga Theatre.

One pole is made from weathered steel that was left over from the Gallipoli to Armistice Memorial in nearby Queens Park.

Steel laser-cut message in multiple languages

Rotary Club of Maryborough Sunrise acting president Adrian Pitman said the Maryborough RSL Club donated the steel, which was laser-cut with ‘May Peace Prevail on Earth’ in multiple languages including the Butchulla language, English, Japanese and Mandarin.

The languages reflect the immigrants who entered Australia through the Port of Maryborough and our sister-city relationships; the piece represents the steel buildings of the former Wilson and Hart Sawmill, which occupied the site before the Brolga Theatre was built and the city’s manufacturing industry.

Mr Pitman said the carved timber log, which was rescued from the bank of the Mary River near Tiaro had been carved by Willy Paes with local flora and fauna to connect with the Mary River, forests and animals and birds of the region.

This piece represents the Timber City and timber industry on which Maryborough was founded.

On the third pole, a steel column has been inset with glass art designed by indigenous artists Aaron Henderson and Samala Cronin depicting local history and creatures of the Dreamtime and environment.

Rotary advocates for international peace

“One of the six areas of focus for Rotary internationally is peace and conflict prevention and resolution,” Mr Pitman said.

“Through service projects, peace fellowships, and scholarships, Rotarians are taking action to address the underlying causes of conflict, including poverty, inequality, ethnic tension, lack of access to education, and unequal distribution of resources.

“Clubs support peace in a myriad of ways from raising awareness of bullying, to helping to protect domestic violence survivors and their families.”

Each year Rotary offers 100 fellowships to Rotary Peace Centres around the world including one at the University of Queensland.

More than 1000 students have graduated from Rotary’s Peace Centres programs.

Visit the Rotary Peace Pole

If you’re ever in the Queensland city of Maryborough, be sure to visit the Rotary Peace Pole.

The beautiful monument is a sight to behold and its message serves as a reminder that peace is possible.

Rotary Peace Pole

 

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So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

A Stitch in Time: Capturing the Colours of Australia

When most people think of Australia, they imagine the bright red outback or the blue water of the Great Barrier Reef. While these holiday hotspots are popular for their vibrant colours, there are so many other hues to see in this great country.

The Colours of Australia exhibition by members of the Hervey Bay Spinners, Weavers and Fibre Artists on the Fraser Coast in Queensland brings together artworks made in response to the inspirational beauty of the Australian landscape.

Hervey Bay Regional Gallery assistant curator Llewellyn Millhouse said the works showcased the deep sense of pride and respect that these artists have for Australia’s natural environment.

“As many members of HBSWFA have experienced living and travelling all around Australia, the land and seascapes depicted in the works are exemplary of the rich diversity of our continent.

“The works feature storm clouds over a desert landscape, mossy logs in a temperate rainforest, wildflowers carpeting open plains and mangrove forests lining a tropical estuary.

“Considered together, these works reveal the natural affinity between textile and landscape, bridging the undulating contours of land and sea with the texture and form of interlocking fibres.

“From the ancient method of drop-spindle to the modern motor-driven spinning wheel, the preparation of raw fibres into workable material is key to the aesthetic process of fibre artists.”

If you’re looking to get a genuine sense of Australian culture, the Colours of Australia exhibition is a must-see.

Colours of Australia Exhibition

Colours of Australia convenor Lidia Godijn shows the major collaborative weaving project of the exhibition. PHOTOS: Jocelyn Watts

 

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Belonging: The backbone of community arts

“The art of spinning and hand-dyeing yarn was often taken for granted,” Mr Millhouse said.

“The derogatory term ‘spinster’ gives us some indications as to how this labour has been valued by the patriarchal cultures of our recent past.

“Along with other skills and productive responsibilities that are deemed ‘women’s work’, both the economic and the artistic value of fibre work has been perpetually under-appreciated.

“This dismissal of women’s labour is exacerbated by the intersection of age discrimination.

“Though the term ‘spinster’ is used less often today, the visibility, value and artistic capacity of older women continue to be undermined by our cultural institutions and in public culture more generally.

“In celebrating the work of spinning and weaving, Colours of Australia is intended as an affirmation of the vibrancy and expertise of the HBSWFA community.

“The beauty of this exhibition lies not just in each of the artworks, but also in the stories, skills and relationships that are fostered by this creative community.

“On visiting the group’s regular meetings, you cannot help but notice the joy and lightness held between its members; a sense of care, humour, connection and solidarity.

“It is these relations of reciprocity and belonging that are the backbone of community arts organisations, and which deserve further artistic recognition by contemporary art institutions.”

The nature of textiles

Textiles are often seen as a gentle art form, but there is great strength in their delicacy.

In order to create such intricate pieces, artists must have a deep understanding of both their craft and their subjects.

The fibres used each have distinct qualities that can be exploited to produce desired results.

Using colour is also integral to the success of these pieces; each hue can evoke a different emotion or feeling in the viewer.

In this Colours of Australia exhibition, the artists have expertly captured both the colours and textures of Australia’s diverse landscapes.

Colours of Australia textile exhibition

Hervey Bay spinner, weaver and fibre artist Jenny White uses a rigid heddle loom.

See Australia through the eyes of local artists

The Colours of Australia exhibition provides visitors with an opportunity to see this country through the eyes of local artists.

These artists have cleverly used textiles and landscapes to create bridges between the contours of land and sea.

As you wander through this exhibition, you’ll be able to appreciate the uniqueness of each piece while also marvelling at the overall cohesion of the show.

In addition to being visually stunning, the Colours of Australia exhibition is also deeply meaningful.

These artworks provide insight into how Australians view their natural environment.

They also reveal the importance that locals place on preserving and protecting our landscape.

This is an exhibition that will leave you feeling proud to be an Australian traveller.

The importance of art

In today’s fast-paced society, it can be easy for people to forget about the importance of slowing down in life and taking momentary pauses to enjoy what surrounds them.

Art has a way of encouraging us to do just that.

It’s a way for people to broaden their horizons and help them to understand they’re not alone in their experiences.

This Colours of Australia exhibition is a beautiful reminder of how connected we are to both our land and one another.

 

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Colours of Australia: A must-see exhibition

This exhibition is a must-see for all people travelling or living in Australia.

The extensive collection of works on display is a testament to the skill and creativity of the local artists and provides a unique insight into the Australian landscape.

If you’re looking to get a genuine sense of Australian culture, this is the perfect place to start.

Whether you’re an art lover or simply appreciate beauty, this stunning display will leave you feeling inspired.

So, make sure you add it to your itinerary when you’re next in Hervey Bay.

Contacting spinning, weaving and fibre artists

Running until 27 November 2022 at the Hervey Bay Regional Gallery, this free exhibition is open Tuesday to Friday 10am to 4pm, at weekends and on most public holidays 10am to 2pm. Check the gallery website for more details.

If you miss this exhibition or are interested in fibre or yarn crafts, you’re invited to contact the Hervey Bay Spinners, Weavers & Fibre Artists on 0457 366 738 or visit them on Facebook.

Australia is a land of many cultures and as such you’re sure to find other spinning, weaving or fibre art groups on your travels through most towns and cities.

You can also learn about spinning, weaving and fibre arts by visiting Shuttles & Needles.

 

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Colours of Australia textile exhibition

Hervey Bay textile artist Gaye Harris on a spinning wheel. Samples of her work are pictured above.

FEATURE PHOTO: Kate Campbell shows her one-of-a-kind, handcrafted scarf.

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you indulge your taste buds and curiosity while discovering the history and culture of Australia.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

9 reasons to visit Jumpers and Jazz in July

Looking for a fun-filled winter getaway in Queensland? Head to the Queensland city of Warwick for Jumpers and Jazz in July.

The 10-day festival celebrates winter with all the exuberant colours of nature and delicious flavours of local foods.

Warwick’s streets come alive with fantastic tree sculptures, yarn bombing exhibitions and a huge car display; there’s a church tower covered by knitwear as well.

And to top it off­­—you get jazz music performed by some amazing musicians who’ve come from near or far just for this occasion too.

Jumpers and Jazz in July began in 2004 when the Warwick Art Gallery wrapped trees in textile art to brighten up the cold winter streets.

The exhibition has since grown into a much-anticipated community event, with locals competing to create the most impressive and creative designs.

Whether you’re into jazz music or just want to take in the festive atmosphere, there’s something for everyone.

For the latest information on festival dates, visit Jumpers and Jazz in July.

 

trees wrapped in knitted art works

Warwick Art Gallery wraps trees in textile art to brighten up the cold winter streets for Jumpers and Jazz in July. Photo: Warwick Art Gallery

 

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1.     Technicolour dreamland made of yarns

If you’ve ever been to Jumpers and Jazz in July, you’ll know that the streets of Warwick are transformed into a technicolour dreamland for the duration of the festival.

That’s all thanks to the Yarntopians yarnbombing team of crafters who combine their skills to produce stunning art installations that attract thousands of festival visitors each year.

Their large-scale installations take months to complete and can involve up to 100 contributors.

Knitters and crocheters send them pieces from all over Australia, and their smaller local team gets together regularly to assemble and install everything.

A chief organiser of one festival project in 2022 was my late mother-in-law, Georgie Watts, a long-time parishioner at St Mark’s Anglican Church. Georgie was heavily involved in St Mark’s display of knitted and crocheted flowers that adorned the historic church’s tower throughout the 2022 festival. Sadly, Georgie didn’t to see the colourful flowers draped over the church tower. She passed away a month before the event.

St Mark's Anglican Church

St Mark’s Anglican Church, Warwick, Queensland.

2.     Art at St Mark’s Anglican Church

St Mark’s Anglican Church is a beautiful heritage-listed church in the heart of Warwick and hosts the annual Art@StMark’s display and sale of high-quality artworks during Jumpers and Jazz in July.

During the 10-day festival, visitors can view and buy art and crafts, and get a bite to eat at their Art Café in the church hall on Grafton Street.

There’s also a Meet the Artists and Official Opening event. For details visit www.warwickanglican.org.au or phone Sharon 0428 614 708.

To book, email artatstmarksno2@gmail.com

 PHOTO GALLERY

3.     Tree Jumper Exhibition

Jumpers and Jazz in July is a great time to check out the Tree Jumper exhibition in Warwick. Up and down the footpath, you’ll find trees wrapped in charming textile artwork.

These yarn-bombed masterpieces are a visual treat for all ages, and they’ll be on display 24 hours a day throughout the festival.

Jumpers and Jazz in July is all about creativity and community participation in the arts, and every year the events and activities continue to grow.

So be sure to check out the program for each day of the winter festival.

 

4.     Grand Automobile Display

If you love cars and music, then you’ll love Jumpers and Jazz in July. This annual winter festival takes place in the charming town of Warwick, Queensland.

The main street of the CBD is closed to traffic, so visitors can admire a static display of veteran, vintage and classic vehicles.

There’s also a selection of classic motorcycles on display, building on Warwick’s growing reputation as the Horsepower Capital of Australia!

During the festival, you can enjoy live jazz performances in various venues around town.

Or if you prefer, you can simply take a leisurely stroll and soak up the atmosphere.

And don’t forget to keep an eye out for the trees dressed in woolly jumpers—it’s all part of the fun!

 

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5.     Celebration of local flavours

Jumpers and Jazz in July is a great opportunity to check out some of the best food and drinks Warwick has to offer.

Stroll & Swing on Palmerin features the Celebration of Local Flavours—an opportunity for the region’s primary producers and boutique or cottage industry vendors to showcase their direct-market goods.

Visitors can enjoy a firsthand experience of local produce at the alfresco dining spaces on the street.

Jumpers and Jazz is a great opportunity to support local businesses. Make sure you don’t miss out!

6.     Women in Motorsport Track Day Invitation

The Warwick District Sporting Car Club is inviting everyone to spend a day at the Morgan Park Raceway for the Women in Motorsport Track Day.

Anyone interested in getting into motorsports can experience the thrill of motorsport and see how it all works.

The club will provide instructions on general maintenance and give you the opportunity to drive your own day-drive car or be a passenger with an experienced driver in a race car.

This is a great opportunity to jumpstart your interest in car racing and build your confidence in-car operations and functions.

For more details or to register your interest, contact the club secretary at secretary@wdscc.com.au.

7.     Markets

Jumpers and Jazz in July has a range of markets where you can find unique, handmade products to help you get into the spirit of the event.

Artisans from all over come to sell their wares and you’re sure to find something that catches your eye.

Whether you’re looking for a new jumper to keep you warm during the cooler nights of the festival or a piece of art to take home with you, head on down and support local artists while getting into the festival spirit.

  • RETRO ROCKING AT THE GALLERY is a small boutique market coordinated by Warwick Art Gallery. Featuring excellent artisans who present amazing bespoke wares of flair and colour, you’ll be able to find some great gifts for friends and family, or maybe even something special for yourself.
  • SHOWCASING OUR ATELIERS
    If you’re ever feeling creative, or need some inspiration, head to Showcasing our Ateliers. You can meet the artisans and immerse yourself in workshops and demonstrations. It’s a great way to get inspired, and maybe even learn a new skill.
  • SUITCASE RUMMAGE MARKET
    Looking for something a little different at Jumpers and Jazz in July? Check out the Suitcase Rummage Market. This unique market features many pre-loved and vintage items, from clothes and jewellery to books and records. And because they sell all of the goods out of suitcases, you never know what you might find. So head on down and rummage through some bargains.
  • WARWICK POTTERS CRAFT MARKET
    Jumpers and Jazz in July culminates in a large craft market on Palmerin Street, with over 200 stalls selling handmade arts and crafts, food and drink. There is also plenty of entertainment on offer, with live music and a wine bar.

8. St Mary’s Community Contemplative Tree

St Mary’s Catholic Church is a beautiful and unique church located at 163 Palmerin Street, Warwick.

The church was built in 1926 and the museum (1865) is also a must-see.

During Jumpers and Jazz in July, people are invited to participate in the Community Contemplative Tree, while enjoying the vista of yarn-bombed palm trees and church pillars.

Hand-knitted and crochet scarves and beanies can be taken home.

The event is also a great opportunity to learn about the history of the church and the Warwick community.

There are also tours of the church and museum available.

St Mary’s Parish is an involved community of the Warwick township and the historical and architectural value are enormous.

The church and museum are a must-see for anyone visiting Warwick.

9. Warwick Art Gallery Exhibitions

The Warwick Art Gallery is a great place to check out some amazing art.

In 2022, the Paper Quilt project is the culmination of their general call out for works on paper that respond to the word “abundance”. It’s on display in the Orange Wall Gallery.

Another exhibition is the Australia Wide 8 Art Quilt Exhibition. This is the latest biennial travelling exhibition in the Australia Wide series, organized by Ozquilt Network Inc.

The exhibition showcases the work of Ozquilt Network members in Australia and overseas. It demonstrates the variety of the ‘stitched and layered textile’.

 

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Want more festival information?

There’s so much more happening than my overview here, so be sure to visit the official website (link below) for this year’s dates, the full program and a list of entertainers.

https://www.jumpersandjazz.com.au/

Where is Warwick?

Warwick is a town in southeast Queensland, Australia, located 130 kilometres southwest of Brisbane, and 83.5 km south of Toowoomba.

With a population of 15,380 (as of June 2018), Warwick is the administrative centre of the Southern Downs Region local government area.

The surrounding Darling Downs has fostered a strong agricultural industry for which Warwick, together with the larger city of Toowoomba, serves as convenient service centres.

Warwick is accessible via the Warwick train station on the Warwick line or by car from any number of Warwick’s multiple exits off the Warrego Highway.

Once in Warwick, visitors can explore a variety of historical landmarks such as:

For those looking for a more modern activity, there are also a number of shopping and dining options available in the Warwick CBD.

Whatever your interests, Warwick has something to offer everyone.


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So, what are you waiting for?

Mark the date in your calendar and get ready for a great time in Warwick.

And, when you’re admiring one of the festival’s many intricate designs, remember—it’s all made of yarn by contributors from throughout Australia.

Jumpers and Jazz in July - musicians

Jazz musicians in concert. Photo: Commons.Wikimedia

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you indulge your taste buds and curiosity while discovering the history and cultures of Australia.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

Add some Western Australia culture to your bucket list

Western Australia is a vast and beautiful part of the world, with plenty to offer travellers looking for new cultural experiences.

From bustling city life to countryside exploration and everything in between, Western Australia has something for everyone.

Here are nine new cultural experiences you can enjoy in Western Australia.

1. Perth’s Van Gough exhibition

One of the most visited multi-sensory experiences in the world is coming to Perth this autumn from May 27 to July 3, 2022.

Van Gogh Alive is an immersive, multi-sensory art experience that turns the life and works of the post-impressionist artist into a larger-than-life experience using large-scale projections, an ambient soundscape, dazzling lights and fragrance.

The exhibition will take place at the Supreme Court Gardens in Perth’s CBD in a specially designed and constructed 25,000-square-foot immersive gallery, which will display over 3,000 images beamed across walls, floors and ceilings.

Tickets for this limited edition season are available to purchase through https://vangoghalive.com.au/perth/

 

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2. Street mural that will take your breath away

An incredible new street mural is brightening up the wall of Perth’s iconic all-inclusive venue, The Court Hotel.

Located in the cultural hub of Northbridge, opposite the new Western Australia Museum Boola Bardip, the colourful artwork represents the diversity of Perth’s LGBTQIA+ community.

Created by world-renowned Fremantle-based artist Jackson Harvey, the thematic direction of the artwork was created after a series of workshops and consultations with the local LGBTQIA+ community.

Colour features strongly in the design, as well as a two-storey-sized unicorn, as the colours of each specific community flag are depicted in a stunning scene of flora and fauna.

The mural design also aims to speak to the local history of the all-inclusive venue and the community, by incorporating the building’s existing Pride Flag into the mural. https://www.thecourt.com.au/

3. The Beaufort opens in Mount Lawley

The Beaufort is a new multi-level, state-of-the-art hospitality venue that has opened its doors on the vibrant Beaufort Street strip in the city-fringing suburb of Mount Lawley.

Taking over a former 1950s warehouse space, the $10 million venue is the second hospitality project from the award-winning team behind The Old Synagogue in Fremantle. Set over three levels, The Beaufort offers patrons multiple venues to explore.

The ground floor features an outdoor beer and wine garden, which leads upstairs to the second level, the heart of the building and the main bar and dance floor area which surrounds the central tiered jungle.

Further upstairs is a large rooftop terrace space known as the Candy Bar, and hidden within the depths of the building is a concealed speakeasy called Cypher – which plays live music each night and has one of the largest spirit collections in Perth.

The venue is also home to Lotus—a modern south-east Asian restaurant serving a unique sharing style menu that is also set over three levels.
https://www.thebeaufort.com.au/

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4. Hi-Fi Listening Bar opens in Northbridge, Western Australia

Perth has recently welcomed the opening of its first hi-fi record listening bar—Astral Weeks.

Located down an alleyway in Northbridge’s Chinatown Precinct, the former herbalist’s shop has been transformed into a 60-seat vinyl-based listening bar.

The hand-built Line Magnetic hi-fi system sits mounted behind the bar, with the venue’s interiors designed to enhance the acoustics experience—with insulated ceilings, carpeted floors and acoustics panels on the walls.

The drinks menu includes a selection of lo-fi wines, craft beers, spirits and sake served by bartenders who are all either musicians or DJs, and who have also curated the bar’s vast vinyl record collection.
https://astral-weeks.com.au/

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5. Mandurah brewery and distillery makes waves

The coastal city of Mandurah, located just an hour south of Perth’s CBD, has recently welcomed the opening of its first microbrewery and distillery, with both venues taking advantage of the city’s idyllic waterside setting.

Boundary Island Brewery is on the water’s edge at the Mandurah Quay Resort and overlooks the stunning Peel Estuary and its namesake, Boundary Island.

The venue is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and offers a range of specialty pizzas prepared in a state-of-the-art pizza oven.

Mandurah Cruises has also launched a new tour to connect its iconic dolphin experience straight to the brewery.

Little Stiller is on the Mandurah Terrace, overlooking the Mandurah Estuary, and produces four specially crafted gins and two vodkas, distilled onsite using locally sourced botanicals.

The boutique venue offers a Little Stiller tasting plate experience, as well as a range of classic cocktails with a fun twist.

A selection of bao buns is on the menu for those feeling hungry, as well as sharing style offerings.

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6. Exclusive wine experience at Margaret River, Western Australia

Gralyn Estate in the renowned Margaret River region of Western Australia has recently reopened its original underground cellar door to offer a new intimate and premium wine tasting experience.

Gralyn Estate was the first winery in the region to open a cellar door in 1978, and the original cellar door had been closed to the public for many years since a new modern cellar door was built upstairs.

Wine lovers now have the opportunity to go behind the scenes and be treated to the rare opportunity to taste museum wines dating back to 1980 in a small group setting.

During the 90-minute experience guests will taste a selection of cornerstone varietals, namely chardonnay and cabernet sauvignon, or premium fortified wines, including the Artizan Rare Muscat which was just recently received the prestigious accolade of ‘Wine of the Year’ at the 2022 London Wine Competition.

The tasting’s hero wine will then be sealed and recorked for guests to take home. https://gralyn.com.au/


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7. Beerfarm brews up its next special edition native series

Beerfarm brewery in the Margaret River region of Western Australia has released a special edition Native Series of brews, a Quandong and Samphire Gose.

The Beerfarm brewers worked alongside Fervor, a regional pop-up dining experience that sources local produce presented in unique locations, and Badgebup Aboriginal Corporation (BAC) to source the ingredients for the eighth edition of the Native Series.

BAC is a small community in Western Australia’s Great Southern region in Goreng Country.

The country that surrounds Badgebup is plentiful with Quandong trees and fresh Samphire from the saline wetlands, which were used to produce the special edition sour brew.

Native Series #8 Quandong & Samphire Gose is available to purchase from the brewery, as well as select bottle shops.
https://www.beerfarm.com.au/

8. Corvo opens in Claremont

Taking over the former Billie H in the Claremont Quarter precinct in Western Australia, Corvo is a European-inspired bar and kitchen.

The owner and sommelier have spent time with Marco Pierre White, and the chef has spent time in a Michelin-starred restaurant in Europe.

The space is designed for wining and dining, with a seasonal European-style menu featuring fine local produce, and a wine list of almost 300 selections, as well as cocktails, beers and bar snacks.
https://corvobar.com.au/

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9. European-inspired bar and restaurant you’ll love

A popular venue in Perth’s city-fringing suburb of Subiaco has recently reopened with a new bar and restaurant offering.

Dilly Dally has undergone a major refurbishment, with Bar Loiter opening at the back of the venue.

The new Italian-inspired bar and restaurant offer seated dining, a long wine table, plus an alfresco space—which was created by removing parts of the roof during the renovation.

Bar Loiter offers a menu of house-made Italian share plates, alongside a drinks selection of cocktails, wine and craft beer on tap.
https://www.dillydally.com.au/bar-loiter/


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So if you’re looking for a cultural experience that’s a little different from the norm, Western Australia is definitely worth checking out.

With so many new Western Australian attractions on offer, you’re sure to find something that piques your interest.

And who knows—maybe you’ll even become a regular visitor!

Western Australia - vineyard

Vineyards in Western Australia are worth checking out!

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you tantalise your taste buds and indulge your curiosity while also discovering history and culture—all that Australia offers.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

When two worlds combine: a revolution of wine and art

Could there be a more fruitful pairing than wine and art?

With ‘paint and sip’ studios popping up all over the country, Australian wine and art enthusiasts can’t get enough of this captivating combo.

From the Mornington Peninsula to Margaret River, many of the premium wineries that make up the Ultimate Winery Experiences collective take guests beyond the cellar door for in-depth journeys of the wine and art kind.

Read on for four of the best.

Contemplating Wine and Art at Montalto

Mornington Peninsula, VIC

wine and art_sculpture

Montalto Sculpture Trail

Montalto, together with the Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, has launched a series of lunchtime wine and art events called Contemplating Art.

Share a moment out of the ordinary as you take a journey with extraordinary artists and their works, in a relaxed environment overlooking the renowned Montalto Sculpture Trail.

Each event showcases an accomplished artist in conversation, exploring the artist’s background, inspiration, techniques and works over a long lunch in The Restaurant at Montalto.

For the first event in the series, Montalto welcomes artist Patricia Piccinini with Danny Lacy, Gallery Director of MPRG, on Thursday 12 May 2022.

Danny was the Guest Judge of the Montalto Sculpture Prize 2021, and along with Creative Director Neil Williams will take guests on a guided walk of the Montalto Sculpture Trail before lunch.

Patricia Piccinini is a Melbourne-based artist, who is best known for her mutant life-like creatures rendered in silicone and hair.

From the start of her career, her work has combined the cute and the grotesque, pitting our impulse to nurture against revulsion, encouraging us to see the beauty of all created forms, however monstrous, deformed or artificial.

Click here to find out more.

Wine & Surrealism

d’Arenberg, McLaren Vale, SA

Sip on impeccable McLaren Vale vino and explore a surrealist exhibition featuring 25 authentic Salvador Dali bronze sculptures and graphic artworks, at the famous d’Arenberg Cube.

Also on display are paintings by Australia’s own surrealist Charles Billich, whose artworks hang in the Vatican, The White House and the United Nations.

A lifelong passion for Surrealism, Charles Billich’s artworks provide the perfect juxtaposition for the magnificent Salvador Dali sculptures.

A contemporary art gallery called the Alternate Realities Museum can be found on the ground floor of the d’Arenberg Cube, where you can embark on a self-guided wine and art tour through tactile displays, such as a wine aroma room, a virtual fermenter, and a 360° video room.

Wine and art buffs dining in d’Arry’s Verandah Restaurant receive free admission to the Dali Exhibition, while pre-booked wine masterclass guests gain access to the Dali exhibition for $10.

 

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Museum of Old and New Art (MONA)

Moorilla at MONA, Tasmania

Moorilla winery shares its site with the innovative Museum of Old and New Art (MONA), home to Australia’s largest private art collection.

Kick off your Moorilla Experience by sailing from Hobart to Mona on their super-flash, high-speed ferry.

Take your time on a self-guided exploration of the subterranean galleries and then head to your one-course lunch of seasonal local produce, matched with a glass of wine from Moorilla’s Muse or Praxis Series.

Fed and watered, you’ll then delve into Moorilla’s backstory with your expert host and get acquainted with the finer points of old and new artisanal winemaking techniques.

You’ll be treated to a tasting of ten different Moorilla/Domaine A wines—elegant, fragrant and often experimental.

Wine and Art at Leeuwin

Margaret River, Western Australia

Family-owned Leeuwin Estate in beautiful Margaret River celebrates fine wine, food and its long association with wine and art.

wine and art - art gallery

Leeuwin Art Gallery

Take a guided stroll through the Leeuwin Art Gallery to view the unique collection of more than 100 contemporary Australian Artworks that have featured on the winery’s iconic ‘Art Series’ labels, while also learning about the famous Leeuwin Concert Series, featuring alfresco performances from the world’s leading musicians and entertainers.

Many notable names from the art fraternity can be found in the Leeuwin Art Gallery.

Sir Sidney Nolan, when approached at the beginning of the series, advised he was not a graphic artist and did not paint for wine labels.

He was also a red wine buff and was sent two unlabelled bottles of the 1982 Cabernet Sauvignon – one of Leeuwin’s best vintages.

He responded that for this wine he would happily provide a painting. This resulted in his Dolphin Rock appearing on the label.

Leeuwin Immersion Experience provides insight into the history of the Margaret River region, the winemaking philosophy and the commitment to the arts of this family-owned Estate.

 

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Discover more at www.ultimatewineryexperiences.com.au

 

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Looking for inspiration for your next adventure?

Is the daily rat race leaving you feeling exhausted?

Jocelyn Magazine acts as a source of inspiration to help you tantalise your taste buds and indulge your curiosity while also discovering history and culture—all that Australia offers.

So, if it’s time for a new adventure, check out some of our travel destination posts here today!

 

 

Anthropologist finds her groove making Comfort Bears

Unemployed anthropologist Vickie Hartland has found her groove up-cycling old jeans to create Comfort Bears for people around the globe.

“Making Comfort Bears is my accidental business,” Vickie said when I met up with her at the Cairns Esplanade Markets in June 2017.

“When found myself out of work, I made a bear for my grandson and put a picture on Facebook then suddenly got orders from all over the world.

“My first trade was an upholsterer. I haven’t done it for many years but I’ve gone back to my original skill set.”

jeansVickie said her Comfort Bears were often used as Grief Bears.

“People grieving the loss of loved ones have got something they can cuddle.

“When my brother died, his youngest son started sleepwalking and we’d find him curled up in a wardrobe or under his dad’s clothes until he got a Comfort Bear.

“For years after my sister lost her husband, she still had his pillow and uniform in a zip lock bag so she could still smell him.

“Another lady whose dad had passed away 10 years earlier still had all of his clothes until she got one of my bears and was able to let go.

Vickie said the Comfort Bears were also ideal for children with autism because they liked a sense of everything the same every day.

“While a child sleeps, you can pop the bear in the washing machine and dryer, then take it back into them and the child never knows it’s gone.”

Vickie’s handmade bears are created from old denim jeans to help keep them away from landfill.

“It’s ridiculous how many jeans end up as landfill,” she said.

“We don’t wear jeans all year round and every season people get new jeans and the old ones end up either in op shops or as landfill.”