History

Mary Ann’s historic name plate reappears

Mary Ann’s priceless name plate comes home

By Jocelyn Watts

A priceless piece of Queensland’s railway history has reappeared after 127 years.

Ipswich railway enthusiast Merv Volker, who visited the Heritage City last week, has donated the name plate from the original Mary Ann locomotive to the Whistlestop museum where its replica locomotive is housed.

Mary Ann was the first steam locomotive built in Queensland by John Walker & Co. Ltd. in 1873 for William Pettigrew and William Sim.

The timber pioneers used the loco to haul logs in the Tin Can Bay area but she vanished in 1893 after a Mary River flood and fire at the Dundathu sawmill where she was stored.

In 1999, Maryborough engineer Peter Olds launched a full-size replica that he and his team at Olds Engineering built using just three historic photographs to guide its creation.  

The Mary Ann replica is now an iconic attraction in Maryborough, regularly chuffing her way through Queens Park pulling carriages filled with enthusiastic sightseers.  

Where has Mary Ann’s name plate been for 127 years?

Mr Volker, a former Granville resident and now volunteer at the Ipswich railway museum, said he bought the solid brass curved plate bearing the name ‘Mary Ann’ from a long-time friend in Gympie.  

“He had it for some years before I bought it from him 23 years ago,” Mr Volker said.

“I don’t know how he came to have it and I don’t want to say how much I paid, but it wasn’t a lot.

“Several times I’ve been going to bring it up to Maryborough but I’ve had doubts about its authenticity.

“I couldn’t give the museum something that was a reproduction. Peter can make his own reproductions – I don’t need to give them one.”

Is it the original name plate?

Mr Olds said he was thrilled to receive the “priceless” railway artifact from Mr Volker.

“It has to be the genuine plate,” he said. “You just can’t put a price on this type of history.”

Telltale signs include it having a reverse curve and no grooves on the back.

“We also got a piece of plate off an old boiler that’s three-foot six diameter and it fits exactly.

“And, the shape of lettering on the plate is identical to the lettering shown in the old photographs.”

Mr Olds said the name plate would have been attached to Mary Ann’s original boiler with two screws.

“There’d be steam pressure on those screws and they wouldn’t come out too easily. Whoever took it off would have had to do so with great care.

“It’s amazing the plate is still in such good condition, apart from being slightly bent.”

What will happen it the historic name plate?

Mr Olds said the Maryborough City Whistlestop committee was planning to fix the original name plate to the Mary Ann replica.

“It’ll be on the rear end of the engine so passengers can see the plate from the front carriage, touch it and take photographs.”

Mary Ann's historic name plate donated to Whistlestop museum

Merv Volker and Peter Olds show where the historic name plate will be placed on the rear of the replica’s engine.

Why donate it now?

When asked what prompted him to donate the plate now, Mr Volker said that being 76 years of age, the time had come to downsize his collection of railway memorabilia.

“There comes a time when you have to clean up after yourself,” he laughed.

“I have a large collection and if I was hit by a bus tomorrow, (my sister) Marilyn (Jensen) would have to clean it up.

“It’s a hell of a job. It’ll take me all year to dispose of it. We’ve been going a couple of months already and there’s still so much other stuff.

“My collection includes a lot of Queensland Railway china. I’m not letting that go, but the rest can go.

“Marilyn knows that if something happens to me, she’s to give the china to the railway museum at Ipswich because there are pieces in there they haven’t got.

“Different people who are involved in collecting railway history have different prime subjects. Some people collect tickets only. Others collect things such as lamps and uniforms.”

Call for more relics and photos

Mr Olds said the Maryborough City Whistlestop committee was keen to accept more donations of other local railway relics and photos, including the second locomotive made by John Walker & Co. Ltd, Mary Ann’s sister ‘Dundathu’.  

To contact the committee phone (07) 4121 0444 or email mborowhistlestop@bigpond.com

For more on Mary Ann’s history, visit https://maryboroughwhistlestop.org.au and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooloola_Tramway

Related Images:

Pineapple motifs symbolise prestige

What’s the deal with so many pineapple motifs?

Have you ever wondered why pineapple motifs are a recurring theme? I have.

It seems like pineapple motifs are everywhere. They’re on shirts, pineapple art, jewellery and ornaments to name just a few.

Pineapples are even featured in one of the mosaics adorning Kent Street at Maryborough, Queensland.

Maryborough Pineapple Mosiac

Maryborough storyteller Ian Brown tells Eriko Badri and daughter Sana from Bundaberg the story of philanthropist Geoge Ambrose White that inspired the creation of the city’s street mosiac in Kent Street in 2020.

The blurb suggests the city’s municipal benefactor, George Ambrose White, who donated money for the construction of the Maryborough Town Hall in the early 1900s, made his money out of pineapples, amongst other things including gold.

Why pineapples?

The pineapple is a member of the Bromeliad family. It is native to South America, most likely from southern Brazil and Paraguay.

It was introduced to Europe in the 15th Century first by Christopher Columbus, who encountered it in Guadeloupe.

It had, by then, spread throughout South and Central America.

In Europe, the pineapple proved hard to cultivate and therein is the answer to why the pineapple remains an emblem, a motif of fashion and prestige.

It became rare and hard to procure and so became a symbol of wealth and power.

A pineapple could sell for as much as $8000 in today’s money.

Those able to acquire a pineapple would use it as a centrepiece for swank affairs. In fact, it was possible to rent pineapples for an event.

The rich and famous adorned their homes and other building with carved pineapples.

Christopher Wren chose gold pineapples to top both the North Towers of St Paul’s Cathedral in London.

Purportedly, it was Barbara Palmer, mistress of King Charles II, who first cultivated the tropical fruit in Europe in a ‘hothouse’ in the late 1600s.

Indeed, King Charles also had official portraits painted in which pineapples appear prominently.

Pineapples on St Pauls Cathedral

 

In Queensland, pineapples are grown in the Sunshine Coast, Wide Bay, Yeppoon, Coastal North Queensland and the Atherton Tableland regions. In the 2012-13 season, the Australian pineapple processing sector produced 39,000 t of fruit for canning and juicing, which was worth $12.5 million.

Queensland Government, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

 

 

Australian Aboriginal Rock Art Gallery

Would you like to see ancient rock art in Queensland?

By Jocelyn Watts

It’s no secret that Australian Aboriginal rock art galleries are among the best ancient rock art galleries in the world.

Now you have a chance to see a previously little-known Aboriginal rock art gallery featuring thousands of ancient paintings and etchings has opened, right here in Queensland.

In 2020, the gallery at Gracevale Station near Aramac in western Queensland opened to the public, just a year after being returned to its traditional owners and renamed Turraburra.

Now the local Iningai people are planning to create a multimillion-dollar education centre at the site.   

This Queensland rock art gallery joins about 100,000 sites Australia-wide, such as the Kakadu National Park, The Kimberley, and the Flinders Ranges.

Australia’s rock art galleries date back 30,000 years or more and attract thousands of tourists every year.

For more information visit https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-10-18/turraburra-gracevale-indigenous-art-site-opens-queensland/12776038 and https://www.australiantraveller.com/australia/seven-amazing-aboriginal-rock-art-sites/

Photo Gallery

In 2012, I was fortunate enough to join a tour of Gracevale Station and Gray Rock with Artesian Country Tours, which has since folded. This photo gallery shows some of my images from that tour.

 

We cannot display this gallery

Related Images: