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sailing

Sailing v sashaying at Yorkeys Knob 

For a landlubber more used to hoofing it across cow paddocks than sailing, when ‘Captain Awesome’ spoke of jibing, I thought he was into dancing. 

You know, jiving! That’s the international ballroom dance style which originated in the United States from African-Americans in the early 1930s and popular throughout the 1940s. 

I must get my hearing checked because I soon discovered the word had a ‘b’ in the middle, not a ‘v’, and it meant putting the stern of a boat through the eye of the wind. 

So last Sunday (June 18, 2017), instead of sashaying across a dance floor, I was shimmying across the waves aboard Captain Awesome’s catamaran with two parallel hulls as shoes. 

The skipper’s 11 meter hand-built cat, Pure Spirit, was one of seven vessels to participate in the Yorkeys Knob Boating Club’s Sunday Fun Sail for June. 

Being ballast-free and therefore lighter than monohulls, Pure Spirit was the fastest vessel on the day and scored the largest handicap, starting about 40 minutes after the first boat began.

It wasn’t long before we’d overtaken Endeavour but the other boats proved more elusive.

Nearing the finish line, it was all hands on deck (except mine as I was in charge of the camera) to trim a few precious minutes off our sail time. 

Alas, first position wasn’t to be this month, as announced at the post-sail presentation on the clubhouse deck as food and stories were shared. 

The opportunity to join the club’s monthly Sunday Fun Sail is open to anyone with $10 in their pocket, even landlubbers like me who don’t know the difference between tacking and jibing. That is, if room is available on any of the boats on the day.

You might be called upon to steer, trim or practice manoeuvres under the watchful eyes of seasoned sailors or you might simply enjoy a day out on the water as an on-board spectator.

It’s all part of the fun of learning about sailing while getting up close and personal with one of Australia’s most beautiful regions. 

The experience might even inspire you to put aside some dollars and one day join the event or club as a boat owner.  

Find out more about sailing

For more details on the Yorkeys Knob Boating Club’s Sunday Fun Sail, phone (07) 4055 7711 or email reception@ykbc.com.au.

Yorkeys Knob Boating Club is located at Yorkeys Knob, 18km northwest of Cairns and 42km southeast of Port Douglas.

Sailing

Fanning Island

Aussie coins gold dust on Fanning Island

THREE Aussie dollars in return for a singing a song had a young lad on Fanning Island thinking he was rich.

Seeing him grin from ear to ear as he showed the booty to his mates was one of the highlights of my day on Fanning Island, part of a cruise around the Hawaiian islands.

Other than cruise passengers, few visitors go to the remote island in the Republic of Kiribati.

Officially known as Tabuaeran Island, the footprint-shaped atoll in the central Pacific Ocean is a sibling of the better-known Christmas Island.

Named after its discoverer Captain Edmund Fanning, the island’s first documented residents were Gilbertese settlers.

The discovery of Polynesian artefacts also suggests early settlements by people from the Cook Islands or Tonga.

Today, the island’s population of about 2000 people are eager to interact and share their culture and way of life.

 

Locals on Fanning Island in Republic of Kiribati are eager to share their culture and way of life.

Locals on Fanning Island in the Republic of Kiribati are eager to share their culture and way of life.

A young mother happily poses for a photo with her little boy.

A young mother happily poses for a photo with her child.

Fanning Island people are mostly self-sufficient and have developed their own businesses and agriculture.

Fanning Island people are mostly self-sufficient and have developed their own businesses and agriculture.

Today, the island's major exports are copra and handcrafts including cowrie shell, shark tooth knives and Kiribati stamps.

They have a seafood-rich diet and export handcrafts including cowrie shell, shark tooth knives and Kiribati stamps.

The remote footprint-shaped atoll in the central Pacific Ocean is a sibling of the better-known Christmas Island.

The remote footprint-shaped atoll in the central Pacific Ocean is a sibling of the better-known Christmas Island.