nautilus

Explore the world’s largest sand island

WORLD Heritage-listed Fraser Island is an ecological masterpiece of giant sand dunes, rain forests, open beaches, freshwater streams and lakes and an exceptional range of unique flora and fauna.

YTravelBlog (2015) and Trip Advisor (2014) named Fraser’s 75-Mile Beach in their must-do lists of Aussie beaches; The Travel Channel (2014) named Fraser Island as a top Australian adventure destination; and Australian Traveller Magazine (2014) named Fraser Island in their top 100 Greatest Holidays in Australia.

To explore the island you can hire a four-wheel drive and take to the sand tracks on your own voyage of discovery.

For those who want to sit back and have an expert off-roader expertly handle conditions, then Kingfisher Bay Resort has an excellent range of daily Ranger-guided four-wheel drive tours to choose from.

Once you have wheels, the island is yours to explore. A good starting point is the superb white sandy beach stretching for 75 miles on the eastern side of the island.

Fraser’s famous 75-Mile beach provides an endless horizon of sand fringed by the ocean and is home to some of the best surf fishing in Australia. Along the beach you will find one of the island’s most visited attractions the wreck of The SS Maheno (formerly a WWI hospital ship) and the landmark rocky outcrops of Indian Head, Waddy Point and Middle Rocks.

Fraser Island has more than 100 dune lakes. The most popular for swimming and picnicking are the spectacular Lake McKenzie, Lake Wabby nestled at the edge of Hammerstone Sand Blow and the picture-perfect Basin Lake.

Fraser Island, the world’s largest sand island and nature lover’s paradise, can be accessed from Hervey Bay, a three-hour drive or 40-minute flight north of Brisbane.

Fraser Island

A mighty mud crab is pictured in front of a stunning Fraser Island sunset.

Fraser Island

One of Fraser Island’s most visited attractions the wreck of the Maheno.

Fraser Island

The Fraser Island dingo is considered one of the last pure strains of dingo remaining on Australia’s east coast.

Fraser Island

This crimson cheeked finch is just one example of the island’s exceptional fauna.

Fraser Island

Fanning Island

Aussie coins gold dust on Fanning Island

THREE Aussie dollars in return for a singing a song had a young lad on Fanning Island thinking he was rich.

Seeing him grin from ear to ear as he showed the booty to his mates was one of the highlights of my day on Fanning Island, part of a cruise around the Hawaiian islands.

Other than cruise passengers, few visitors go to the remote island in the Republic of Kiribati.

Officially known as Tabuaeran Island, the footprint-shaped atoll in the central Pacific Ocean is a sibling of the better-known Christmas Island.

Named after its discoverer Captain Edmund Fanning, the island’s first documented residents were Gilbertese settlers.

The discovery of Polynesian artefacts also suggests early settlements by people from the Cook Islands or Tonga.

Today, the island’s population of about 2000 people are eager to interact and share their culture and way of life.

 

Locals on Fanning Island in Republic of Kiribati are eager to share their culture and way of life.

Locals on Fanning Island in the Republic of Kiribati are eager to share their culture and way of life.

A young mother happily poses for a photo with her little boy.

A young mother happily poses for a photo with her child.

Fanning Island people are mostly self-sufficient and have developed their own businesses and agriculture.

Fanning Island people are mostly self-sufficient and have developed their own businesses and agriculture.

Today, the island's major exports are copra and handcrafts including cowrie shell, shark tooth knives and Kiribati stamps.

They have a seafood-rich diet and export handcrafts including cowrie shell, shark tooth knives and Kiribati stamps.

The remote footprint-shaped atoll in the central Pacific Ocean is a sibling of the better-known Christmas Island.

The remote footprint-shaped atoll in the central Pacific Ocean is a sibling of the better-known Christmas Island.

rotary

St Mary’s student beams about all things science

WHAT do ice-cream, glandular fever, sunburn and Walt Disney all have in common?

Leticia Fuller of Maryborough and her nine state counterparts who attended a three-day science experience at University of Southern Queensland (USQ) Toowoomba.

Still beaming with excitement, Ms Fuller shared details of her experience with her sponsor, the Rotary Club of Maryborough Sunrise, at a recent breakfast meeting.

Rotary Sunrise President Glenda Pitman said the club sponsored Ms Fuller by covering the program cost.rotary

“Leticia is a very conscientious and hard-working student,” Mrs Pitman said.

“It’s wonderful to hear such an eloquent and enthusiastic student talk about her experiences. She is obviously passionate about science and a great ambassador for Rotary.”

Leticia told Rotarians her experience in Toowoomba was “absolutely amazing!”

“We studied all different science things from engineering and hematology to agronomy and astronomy,” the Year 9 St Mary’s College student said.

“During the event we made soft-serve ice-cream using liquid nitrogen, cream, milk and vanilla essence.

“We also went into different science and medical laboratories to see what university labs look like.

“In the medical lab we looked at hematology and did a full DNA test. Within the samples I had, I diagnosed someone with malaria, glandular fever and diabetes.

“With agronomy, the study of plants, we looked at wheat, barley and sugarcane and the different sorts of root crops as well as photosynthesis and how changing the C02 levels, temperature and colour of light can affect how fast and slow they grow.

“We also looked at UV radiation. Even when it’s cloudy UV radiation is still there so you can still get sun burnt, just not as bad. We had clear UV beads and when we were inside a building they were completely clear and see-through but when we went into the sun, depending on the strength they changed colour to vibrant pink, purple or yellow.

“Even sitting in a car, if you have windows that aren’t tinted the UV is coming through so you can still get sun burnt. We learnt how it causes skin cancer and kills cells within us.”

Ms Fuller said engineering activities included designing the keyboard of a laptop computer using a circuit board, paper and a pencil so that when keys drawn on the paper were pressed they connected to the computer.

“It’s amazing to see what you can do with a computer. You wouldn’t think a computer could take your life so far but it does.

“One of our instructors used to work for Walt Disney Productions. She was one of those who did all the animations in movies and showed us in depth how they’re all created.

“We also looked at computer programming games and created our own programs while were there.”

Ms Fuller hopes her interest in all things science will lead to a career in pediatric nursing.

The ConocoPhillips Science Experience is designed to provide Year 9 and 10 students who have an interest in science with an opportunity to engage in a wide range of fascinating science activities under the guidance of scientists who love their work.

The event takes place in over 35 universities and tertiary institutions across Australia.

-ENDS-

Photo:  Maryborough’s St Mary’s College Year 9 student Leticia Fuller joins other science enthusiasts at this year’s ConocoPhillips Science Experience.

Media Contact: Jocelyn Watts, Email: jocey@jocelynwatts.com; Phone: 0403 191 958